Influence of Age and Genders on the Relationship between Computer Self-Efficacy and Information Privacy Concerns

Influence of Age and Genders on the Relationship between Computer Self-Efficacy and Information Privacy Concerns

Mohammad A. Awwal (Rider University, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 24
DOI: 10.4018/jthi.2012010102
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Abstract

The Internet and the growth of Information Technology (IT) and their enhanced capabilities to collect personal information have given rise to many privacy issues. This study investigated the differences among different age groups and between genders regarding information privacy concerns and their relationships with computer self-efficacy. The study used a paper-based survey instrument and collected data by using the mall-intercept approach in which individuals were asked to fill out the survey. The target population of this study was the 400 residents of the state of New Jersey, U.S.A. in three age groups: 18-25, 26-50, and 50+. The results show that only male and age group of 26-50 have positive and significant relationship between computer self-efficacy and information privacy concerns. The findings of this study can help corporations to improve e-commerce by targeting privacy policy-making efforts to address the explicit areas of consumer privacy concern.
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Problem Statement

The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences among different age groups (18-25, 26-50, and 50+) and between genders regarding information privacy concerns and their relationships with computer self-efficacy. Computer self-efficacy has been shown to be an effective predictor of behavioral intention (Ball, 2008) and a critical predictor of an individual’s attitude about information technology and usage behaviors (Marakas, Yi, & Johnson, 1998). Consumers’ privacy concerns are complex and practitioners and researchers need to understand antecedents to consumers’ concerns regarding information privacy (Stewart & Segars, 2002). Several studies (Malhotra, Kim, & Agarwal, 2004; Metzger, 2004; Phelps, Nowak, & Ferrel, 2000; Anton, Earp, He, Stufflebam, Bolchini, & Jensen, 2004) have shown that if consumers’ privacy concerns are not understood and mitigated, they can have negative consequences on e-commerce growth and Internet purchases. White et al. (2008) studied the relationship between computer self-efficacy and information privacy concerns. Their study focused on computer self-efficacy and its relationship with four information privacy components (collection of data, errors (data integrity), unauthorized secondary use, and improper access to data) as defined by Smith, Milberg, and Burke (1996). They did not study the differences of relationships between information privacy concerns and computer self-efficacy among different age groups and genders. White et al. (2008) stressed the need to extend their work by examining the differences of the relationships among different age groups and between genders. The goal of this study is to extend their work by investigating differences among different age groups and between genders regarding information privacy concerns and their relationships with computer self-efficacy.

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