Samizdat 2.0: The Dymovsky Case and the Use of Streaming Video as a Political Tool in Contemporary Russia

Samizdat 2.0: The Dymovsky Case and the Use of Streaming Video as a Political Tool in Contemporary Russia

Beth Knobel (Fordham University, USA) and Jonathan Sanders (State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 16
DOI: 10.4018/jep.2012010103
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Abstract

This paper examines the case of Russian Police Major Aleksei Dymovsky, who took the unprecedented step of posting a video on the Internet in 2009 in which he exposed the corrupt practices of Russian law enforcement officials. When the video went “viral,” Dymovsky set off a national debate about corruption, but was quickly crushed by the authorities for whistleblowing. This paper uses the example of the Dymovsky affair to examine the power of streaming video as a political tool in Russia. It also examines the difference between the underground literature of the Soviet-era, samizdat, and the new-style video samizdat of the Internet era. The case of Dymovsky allows the power of the Internet in contemporary Russia to be examined and provides an opportunity to test current theories about the power of the Internet as an organizing force.

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