The Use of Geospatial Technology in Disaster Management

The Use of Geospatial Technology in Disaster Management

Scott Westlund (University of Manitoba, Canada)
Copyright: © 2010 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/jagr.2010070102
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

The daily use of geospatial technology, such as the global positioning system (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing (RS), is increasing. The use of geospatial technology in disaster management is a natural fit because almost every aspect of a disaster is referenced by location. This paper presents the results of a recent web-based survey of disaster management practitioners. Findings reveal that more than 60% of disaster management practitioners are currently using geospatial technology and 70% plan to use it in a future disaster management activity. However, the results indicate that most disaster management practitioners have a low level of knowledge of geospatial technology. The survey findings also show that geospatial technologies enhance situational awareness, cost is a major challenge for practitioners who would like to use them, and an opportunity exists for the academic community to engage with practitioners to help them raise their level of geospatial knowledge.
Article Preview

Basis For Investigation

Geospatial technologies include global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the global positioning system (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing (RS). Geospatial technologies can provide accurate, current location based data for use in disaster management. Indeed, the use of geospatial technologies in disaster management is a natural fit because location is a key element of disaster management. Almost everything in a disaster, including the event, resources, risks, hazards, and people, is referenced by location (Gunes & Kovel, 2000; Kevany, 2005; Parker & Stileman, 2005). However, based on my personal observations, interactions, and discussions with disaster management practitioners in the province of Manitoba, Canada, the use of geospatial technology in disaster management, at least at the local level, is not common.

Complete Article List

Search this Journal:
Reset
Open Access Articles: Forthcoming
Volume 9: 4 Issues (2018): 1 Released, 3 Forthcoming
Volume 8: 4 Issues (2017)
Volume 7: 4 Issues (2016)
Volume 6: 4 Issues (2015)
Volume 5: 4 Issues (2014)
Volume 4: 4 Issues (2013)
Volume 3: 4 Issues (2012)
Volume 2: 4 Issues (2011)
Volume 1: 4 Issues (2010)
View Complete Journal Contents Listing