A TL-TPACK Model on CSL Pre-Service Teachers' Competencies of Online Instruction

A TL-TPACK Model on CSL Pre-Service Teachers' Competencies of Online Instruction

Hsiu-Jen Cheng (National Kaohsiung Normal University, Taiwan)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 28
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-0483-2.ch011
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Abstract

This chapter aims to introduce the integration of TPACK into a Chinese pre-service teacher training program and discuss its outcomes and challenges. First, the concept of TPACK was introduced and relevant TPACK research and its constraints in the previous studies were discussed. Through the partnership between a Chinese pre-service teacher training program in Taiwan and a Chinese learning program in the States, the author developed a Teaching and Learning Model, entitled TL-TPACK model, integrating practicum, course design, advisors, peer cooperation, and reflections—five training strategies to ensure the training and learning outcome. At the end of the chapter, an empirical Chinese pre-service teacher training study applying the TL-TPACK model was conducted to investigate pre- service teachers' seven TPACK competences and Chinese learners' learning performance. Finally, research implications and suggestions for future studies were discussed.
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Technology And Chinese Teacher Education

Researchers found that some teacher training programs place ICT (Information and Communication Technology) courses as an elective option (Brown & Warschauer, 2006; Hsu & Sharma, 2006; Lim et al., 2010). Take teaching Chinese as CS/FL institutions in Taiwan as an example. There are approximately seventeen CS/FL teacher training institutions and only forty percent of them (around seven institutions) list this course: Multimedia Assisted Chinese Instruction as a requisite for undergraduate pre-service teacher programs. Out of the seven institutions, only one institution offers this course as a requisite at the master level. Considering the larger population of undergraduate students, this reality shows that pre-service Chinese teachers with a bachelor’s degree may acquire more knowledge about technology instruction than those with master’s degree. In general, insufficient instructional technology training offered through Chinese pre-service teacher programs is certainly evident in Taiwan, even though Taiwan is considered a high-tech country, where the accessibility of technology products for teachers is not a problem.

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