Building Lifecycle Information Management Case Studies

Building Lifecycle Information Management Case Studies

Martin Riese (Gehry Technologies, Hong Kong)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-928-1.ch028
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Abstract

A number of industries in other sectors have experienced substantial improvements in productivity due to the implementation of new technologies and associated working practices. In the industry of the built environment these new technologies and working practices are helping to bring about global “construction industry transformation.” Very large and complex three dimensional design and construction information databases can now be aggregated and managed collaboratively over the internet by large project teams working remotely from each other. Whilst person to person meetings are still essential for project teams, a certain amount of remote working can be accommodated. In the past, construction projects experienced many problems resulting from incompletely coordinated and two dimensional construction information that often contained inaccuracies and inconsistencies. The improved quality of design and construction information that is being produced now is making it possible to deliver better quality buildings. By reducing abortive works on site, buildings can be delivered on time and with reduced post construction claims and penalties. Accelerated and enhanced innovation is being enabled by connecting state of the art modelling and simulation technologies directly to the three dimensional design and construction databases. This is making it possible to deliver previously impossible designs. Affordable mass customization and the potential for industry supply chain integration is being enabled by the application of automation to design and construction information management. Additional improvements in efficiency and innovative design, delivery and facilities management are being made possible by this integration of all aspects of the supply chain (i.e. industry supply chain integration). In addition, substantial improvements to the everyday quality of life throughout the world will be brought about by the growing application of parametric generative computer-aided design, virtual prototyping, and lifecycle analysis and simulation.
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1 Introduction

Over the past three decades, new information technologies and working practices have been increasingly adopted in industries such as aerospace and automobile production. This implementation of new ways of working has steadily increased, resulting in improved effectiveness and efficiency in these industries. Two dimensional paper-based processes result in more mistakes and abortive works that have a negative effect on the overall design quality and production efficiency of the resulting -mass produced- products. Increasingly, the reduction, and even complete removal of two dimensional, paper-driven processes from design and production, is making -increased efficiency, quality and safety- possible in numerous industries throughout the world.

These same new technologies and working practices are now beginning to deliver similar value to the industry of the built environment as is being realized in other industries. This chapter will introduce a number of large design and construction projects which are demonstrating this trend. The value and process innovation that is already being achieved is demonstrated by the virtual pre-coordination, analysis and simulation of the life cycles of these substantial design and construction projects. Ever increasing improvements in value, quality and safety enhancements to the industry as a whole, are being made possible by the growing trend towards the “virtualization” of the design and lifecycle information management process.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Parametric Object Oriented Design: The implementation of technology that enables local and/or global changes to three dimensional design data before, during or after the formulation of the initial design.

Building Lifecycle Management: The integrated coordination, organization and control of all of the information about a building project in advance of its design and construction and continuing throughout its entire lifecycle, i.e. from the inception of the project pro forma through design, construction and the day to day operation of the building until and including its demolition.

Automated Clash Detection: The implementation of technologies and working practices that produce clash lists directly from three dimensional Building Information Modeling databases automatically and without the need for further manual investigation.

Automated Two Dimensional Drawing Production: The implementation of technologies and working practices that create two dimensional drawings from three dimensional Building Information Modeling databases automatically and without the need for further manual embellishment.

Construction Process Simulation: The virtual optimization and pre-validation of the construction methodology of a project prior to the commencement of the actual works.

Automated Quantity Management: The implementation of technologies and working practices that produce bills of quantity directly from three dimensional Building Information Modeling databases automatically and without the need for further manual adjustment.

Internet-Based Collaboration: The implementation of fully integrated software tools that function entirely over the internet to enable large project teams to progress the coordination and integration of all project information via a single three dimensional data base that permits concurrent data engagement.

Full Supply Chain Engagement: The integration of all project design and fabrication information in a single, internet-based three dimensional database that enables fabrication level data to flow in all directions without interruption or transfer between platforms.

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