CBM Elements IV

CBM Elements IV

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 41
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch010
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Abstract

This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural history is covered in its entirety. Cultural history covers these types of history:.artistic, agricultural, crime, disease, economic, educational, ethnic, familial, gender, geographic, health, legal, linguistic, political, racial, religious, reproduction, science, sexual intercourse, social, time periods. Cultural history is a narrative representation of events. This history is comprehensive in that it includes many of the histories that have been written by or about a population. Histories serve to preserve the past, tell the stories of human beings, record information, and chronicle a legacy. The point of building or researching a cultural history, according to Burke (2004), is to explore new facets of history and re-evaluate the old.
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Cultural History

  • E8. Cultural History - Narrative representation of historical events.

Cultural history covers these types of history: artistic, agricultural, crime, disease, economic, educational, ethnic, familial, gender, geographic, health, legal, linguistic, political, racial, religious, reproduction, science, sexual intercourse, social, time periods.

Cultural history is a narrative representation of events. This history is comprehensive in that it includes many of the histories that have been written by or about a population. Histories serve to preserve the past, tell the stories of human beings, record information, and chronicle a legacy. The point of building or researching a cultural history, according to Burke (2004), is to explore new facets of history and re-evaluate the old.1

A cultural history is a universal history that includes all information that is discovered. This information can be gathered from a variety of sources including primary source documents, secondary source documents, oral histories, interviews, artifacts, and other forms of media. Within the larger society, histories may be recorded or chronicled by historians, writers, scribes, or other persons who are known to possess knowledge or who can interpret knowledge. Other histories may be documented by local inhabitants. Locate histories written about the population from people who live in and outside of the society or culture. Oral histories, that are recorded personal narratives of everyday people, may also be acquired. These histories aid in obtaining a balanced representation and can further authenticate historical representations. If these histories do not exist, then this weakness may become evident in the design. Access multiple media formats (pamphlets [e.g., religious, fraternal], radio, newspapers, magazines, books, television, documentaries, local historical societies, etc.) to compile these histories. There are also other methods for gathering historical data such as chronology, cliometrics, demographics, genealogy, and historiography.

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