Choosing the Right Pathway: A Matrix of Influences Related to Selection of Higher Education Destination Abroad

Choosing the Right Pathway: A Matrix of Influences Related to Selection of Higher Education Destination Abroad

Donna M. Velliaris (Eynesbury Institute of Business and Technology, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9746-1.ch010
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Abstract

The Eynesbury Institute of Business and Technology (EIBT) is a pre-university pathway institution to the University of Adelaide or the University of South Australia. This chapter contributes to improving the understanding of the various factors that underpinned EIBT students' decision with regards to choosing Australia, and more specifically Adelaide and EIBT, as their study destination. International student applicants are located within a complex matrix of influences that can be effectively represented by overlapping spheres of push (operating in the home country) and pull (operating in the host country) factors. As evidenced in the qualitative data collected from a mandatory online questionnaire targeted at newly enrolled EIBT students, international mobility not only contributes to the internationalisation of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), but also impacts on the outlooks, subsequent lifestyles and future careers of the students themselves. Pathway institutions offer valuable partnerships for HEIs and this study contributes to that rather shallow body of knowledge.
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Background

Part of the Navitas Group, EIBT was founded in 1998 and has since established a strong profile for pre-university pathways. Specific to this research are the students who enter EIBT to undertake a Diploma in:

  • 1.

    Business;

  • 2.

    Information Technology; or

  • 3.

    Engineering, packaged with The University of Adelaide or the University of South Australia.

EIBT recruitment is predominantly directed towards full fee-paying international students who:

  • 1.

    Have completed Year 11 high school in Australia and would prefer to continue their studies in a different academic context;

  • 2.

    Have completed Year 12 high school in Australia, but did not obtain an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR score) sufficient for direct entry into university;

  • 3.

    Have graduated from high school abroad, but whose English language proficiency did not meet the minimum requirement for direct entry into university;

  • 4.

    Have graduated from high school abroad, but whose academic results did not meet the minimum requirement for direct entry into university; or

  • 5.

    Are above 20 years of age with a relevant employment history (Velliaris & Willis, 2014a; Velliaris, Willis, & Breen, 2015).

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