Collecting Activity-Travel and Planning Process Data Using GPS-Based Prompted Recall Surveys: Recent Experience and Future Directions

Collecting Activity-Travel and Planning Process Data Using GPS-Based Prompted Recall Surveys: Recent Experience and Future Directions

Joshua Auld (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) and Abolfazl (Kouros) Mohammadian (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6170-7.ch004
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Abstract

This chapter details the design, implementation, and evaluation of an Internet-based prompted recall survey that utilized GPS data collection. The design of the survey was unique in terms of prompted recall surveys using GPS with the use of instantaneous data processing, learning algorithms to reduce respondent burden, and the inclusion of questions relating to activity-planning behavior in a prompted recall survey. In the Urban Travel Route and Activity Choice Survey (UTRACS), data was collected on long-term activity-travel behavior and planning processes for 112 individuals over an average of 10 days. The results of the survey show that the planning data obtained from the survey respondents appear to be reliable, with minimal fatigue and conditioning effects. The documentation of the survey design process, coupled with the promising results, show how GPS-based prompted recall surveys using an Internet-based survey mode can collect useful activity processing data over long timeframes.
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Background

The use of GPS data in activity and travel surveying is a relatively new practice, made possible through improvements in the technology itself and the demand for more accurate travel data. The use of GPS data began with a series of demonstration studies designed to prove the ability to use GPS for identifying activity-travel patterns, and has branched out to several more advanced applications in travel surveying. Currently, most GPS surveys are conducted to provide trip rate corrections to traditional activity diary surveys. However, work is being done on using GPS to monitor changes in overall travel patterns, develop passive activity-travel diaries, and to generate interactive prompted recall activity-travel surveys.

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