An Exploratory Study of Patient Acceptance of Walk-In Telemedicine Services for Minor Conditions

An Exploratory Study of Patient Acceptance of Walk-In Telemedicine Services for Minor Conditions

Christina I. Serrano (University of Georgia, USA) and Elena Karahanna (University of Georgia, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-988-5.ch097
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Abstract

Though healthcare costs continue to soar, the healthcare industry lags other service industries in applying information technology to improve customer (i.e., patient) service, improve access to healthcare services, and reduce costs. One particular area of concern is overuse and overcrowding of emergency departments for nonurgent care. Telemedicine is one potentially important application of information technology in this realm. The objective of this study is to examine the antecedents of patient acceptance of walk-in telemedicine services for minor ailments. Drawing upon theoretical models in the healthcare and technology acceptance literatures and based on salient beliefs elicited during interviews with 29 potential adopters, the authors develop a conceptual model of antecedents of patient acceptance of walk-in telemedicine services for minor conditions. While relative advantage, informational influences, and relationship with one’s physician emerged as important predictors of acceptance, media richness and e-consultation diagnosticity emerged as central concerns for potential adopters. They discuss the study’s implications for research and practice and offer suggestions for future empirical studies.

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