The Impact of Leadership Style on Knowledge Sharing Intentions in China

The Impact of Leadership Style on Knowledge Sharing Intentions in China

Qian Huang (University of Science and Technology of China, China), Robert M. Davison (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Hefu Liu (University of Science and Technology of China, China) and Jibao Gu (University of Science and Technology of China, China)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-920-5.ch009
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Abstract

Knowledge management (KM) is a dominant theme in the behavior of contemporary organizations. While KM has been extensively studied in developed economies, it is much less well understood in developing economies, notably those that are characterized by different social and cultural traditions to the mainstream of Western societies. This is notably the case in China. This chapter develops and tests a theoretical model that explains the impact of leadership style and interpersonal trust on the intention of information and knowledge workers in China to share their knowledge with their peers. All the hypotheses are supported, showing that both initiating structure and consideration have a significant effect on employees’ intention to share knowledge through trust building: 28.2% of the variance in employees’ intention to share knowledge is explained. The authors discuss the theoretical contributions of the chapter, identify future research opportunities, and highlight the implications for practicing managers.

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