Introduction

Introduction

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0240-3.ch001
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Abstract

This book focuses on the other 99 percent of workers who do not fit into the executive or board member ranks within organizations. Where does their value to the organization reside? Is it in their location, use, maintenance, modification, time value or a combination thereof (Hughes, 2010)? As economies around the world sit at the precipice of collapse, younger workers are beginning to rebel against excessive unemployment and what they perceive as unfair distribution of wealth. Technology, specifically social media, has been implicated as the source by which the demonstrations started, yet this author would contend that technology in the workplace that is valued more than people is the true culprit. Technology has been displacing workers for generations. Training and education are not one and the same. Individuals often benefit most from a combination of both education and training because training can build on what one has been taught in school environments, and education can build upon and broaden an individual’s knowledge in a specific skill area (Banks, 2002; Schein 1988). Organizations want the best performance from their employees; however, without knowledge and skill, employees cannot provide their best performance. Employers must clearly share their expectations or intentions with their employees. The objectives of this chapter are to discuss: 1) The intention of management with regards to people and technology development within organizations; 2) The ways that managers currently value people and technology in the workplace.
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Introduction

In many instances when technology is mentioned, the mind tends to think of computer technology. The introduction of the personal computer has made computer technology relevant to the masses. However, technology goes well beyond computers and is thus not limited to that field within this book. The targets audiences of this book are HR managers and corporate leaders. This does not imply that people are more important than technology. Technology appears to be valued more than people even when it is already known to exist throughout all organizations. There is a perceived need for more technology and less people in US workplaces.

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