Open Judiciary in High Courts: Securing a Networked Constitution, Challenges of E-Justice, Transparency, and Citizen Participation

Open Judiciary in High Courts: Securing a Networked Constitution, Challenges of E-Justice, Transparency, and Citizen Participation

Jesus Cano (Constitutional Court, Spain & UNED University, Spain & IEEE eGovernment, USA), Luis Pomed (Constitutional Court, Spain), Carlos E. Jiménez-Gómez (Department of Justice of the Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Spain) and Roberto Hernández (UNED University, Spain)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-0717-8.ch003
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

With this work, it is hoped to offer an insight into open judiciary applied to the specific context of constitutional courts in the Civil Law system from both a legal and technological point of view. The advances in IT are now becoming the drivers of social change and new ways for citizens and public administrations to interrelate. Information technology has enabled a different way for citizens to access public services under an e-Government umbrella to a greater or lesser degree of success. In the area of e-Justice it would appear that advances are perceived in different ways, particularly in the higher courts. This chapter will set out how constitutional justice is integrated into the world of electronic justice as an example of a genuine challenge that is full of paradoxes.
Chapter Preview
Top

Challenges Of Open Judiciary

Presented herein is a perspective on the controversies or problems in relation to the constitutional position around the openness of thought of information technologies. To support the arguments we set out four challenges introducing some key aspects.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset