Partnerships

Partnerships

Linda L. Baer (Minnesota State Colleges and State Universities, USA) and Ann Hill Duin (University of Minnesota, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 8
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-198-8.ch235
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Abstract

The rapidly changing environment in society is cause for higher education to reassess approaches to meeting educational needs. Many key factors are in a dynamic flux: these include growing numbers of students, more diverse populations of students, the need for more responsive educational content and modes of delivery, and the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the economy. At the same time that new and pervasive demands face higher education, we are experiencing a shift away from high, predictable public support to increased reliance on tuition and outside funding sources. Partnering, now more than ever, is a critical component of success. Partnerships enable people and organizations to support each other by leveraging, combining, and capitalizing on their complementary strengths and capabilities, thereby achieving more than either partner working alone. However, successful partnering demands new ways of doing business and greater understanding of the factors contributing to successful partnerships.
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Introduction

The rapidly changing environment in society is cause for higher education to reassess approaches to meeting educational needs. Many key factors are in a dynamic flux: these include growing numbers of students, more diverse populations of students, the need for more responsive educational content and modes of delivery, and the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the economy.

At the same time that new and pervasive demands face higher education, we are experiencing a shift away from high, predictable public support to increased reliance on tuition and outside funding sources. Partnering, now more than ever, is a critical component of success. Partnerships enable people and organizations to support each other by leveraging, combining, and capitalizing on their complementary strengths and capabilities, thereby achieving more than either partner working alone. However, successful partnering demands new ways of doing business and greater understanding of the factors contributing to successful partnerships.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Partnering Intelligence: A measurement of how well we build relationships and cultivate trust while accomplishing predetermined tasks in an alliance with someone else. A measure of the ability to succeed in partnership situations. It is measured by how well we are able to create and sustain healthy and mutually beneficial partnerships.

Partnership: A relationship between two or more entities involving close cooperation where each entity has specific responsibilities.

Dimensions of Partnering: A tool that assists partners in determining the extent of partner diversity and task specificity as they contribute to shared vision and organization of the partnership (Tools for Development:10 Building Partnerships, n.d.).

Connected Organization: An organization that serves the common good, serves constituents, creates a culture of service, collaborates, and engages in healthy internal communication.

Partnership Portfolio: The development of strategic sets of partnerships which results in intentional sets of partners to leverage and maximize goal accomplishment.

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