Processes and Application in Additive Manufacturing: Practices in Aerospace, Automobile, Medical, and Electronic Industries

Processes and Application in Additive Manufacturing: Practices in Aerospace, Automobile, Medical, and Electronic Industries

Ajit Behera (National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India)
Copyright: © 2020 |Pages: 23
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-4054-1.ch002
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Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) is going to cover all the segments of industries from missile industry to biomedical industry. This marked change of technology is due to the distinctive potential of AM to fabricate the parts with intricate designs and reduce fabrication expenditure (free from machining, waste generation, assembly of various parts) with small production runs and short turnaround times. This chapter extensively discussed industrially practiced AM technology. In this chapter, all additive manufacturing materials like metal, alloys, polymer, ceramics, composite, etc. have been given focus for various applications. Additive manufacturing technology is cost effective: no loss of metal and easy to fabricate both larger and intricate shapes. This technology already has taken a primary position in aerospace industries as well as the medical and household industries.
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Steps Of Material Fabrication By Manufacturing

AM technology consists of five basic steps as follow (figure 1):

Key Terms in this Chapter

Superelasticity: This is also known as pseudoelasticity property. This is a property of shape memory alloys trained at austenitic temperature to regain its shape without any deformation.

Bio-Printer: This an additive manufacturing process using biological cell/tissue.

Graphene: This is the basis structural unit of carbon based nanomaterials. Each carbon atoms in graphene are sp 2 hybridise bonded with other carbon atom looks like a dense one atomic thick structure.

Superalloy: These are the alloys that can increase their strength with increase in temperature. Generally working under the temperature >0.7 Tm without creep.

Maraging Steel: Maraging steels are carbon free FeNi-alloys with additions of Co, Mo, Ti, Al. The term maraging comes from the strengthening mechanism that transforming the alloy to martensite with subsequent age hardening.

Shape Memory Effect: This is a property of shape memory alloy (SMA) that can regain its shape when the deformed shape is subjected to the temperature, higher than the austenitic temperature.

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