Readiness for Agriculture Companies Effectiveness Begin With Employee Motivation

Readiness for Agriculture Companies Effectiveness Begin With Employee Motivation

Ibrahim Oba (Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria) and Diana Andreea Mândricel (Titu Maiorescu University, Romania)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-8356-1.ch075

Abstract

The main aim of this article is to contribute to the understanding of the organizational change and the effect of the human factor within the management of change in nigerian agriculture companies. The method approached considers an investigative study to identify the main directions of the manifestation of organizational performance among private companies to identify and motivate employees' contribution to organizational performance. The results reveal that the best motivation strategies remain those that take into account employees' motivation and satisfaction levels and determine their degree of involvement. Finally, these findings are relevant for the transformation of human resources from a passive state to an active one in producing and implementing change.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

In a world where success is obligatory, the prospect of change is inevitable and omnipresent (Ali, 2016; Guillén & Saris, 2013; Petrick, 2017). The landscape of numerous external forces makes the existence and survival of prosperity extremely difficult (Ericksen & Dyer, 2005; Pettigrew et al., 2001). Indeed, the major problem agribusinesses face today is the efficient management of the initiatives of strategic change, and the fundamental difference between successful organizations and those that fail is the ability to keep up with change (Meyerding, 2017; Cohen & Bailey, 1997; Meuer, 2017; Podsakoff & Organ, 1986). In other words, organizations in agriculture have to monitor and study inter or extern environments to anticipate and adapt quickly to change.

Agricultural enterprises have stated that organizations have a problem with anticipating and adapting to what happens in their environments (Meyerding, 2015; Bourlakis et al., 2014; Jung et al., 2016). This inability to recognize changes in the business environment can be a factor that determines the lack of performance in the field of competitiveness. To succeed, organizations in agriculture need to adopt a systematic approach to change. In this respect, they will have to simultaneously manage all the challenges of change. These changes at the organizational level have increased the importance of managing change and especially managing the experience of change in personnel (Pieper et al., 2017; Rojon et al., 2015; Strauss et al., 2012). This is due to the fact that major changes have an impact on all the members of the organization because these changes can create new dimensions of uncertainty.

Motivation is a complex process that is rooted in the world of instincts and finds (Antoni, 2004). In motivation, everything is based on need, which is generates an action or a movement defined as an entire system of impulses, prompting, internal pulses, energizing or activations, tense states, or motives of actions and conduct (Richer et al., 2002). Enhanced motivation is achieved from a homeostatic perspective, that is, the need for the organization to develop under normal operating conditions. Motivation requires through keeping constant the physiological functioning of the body, which determines individual behavior with regard to the desired behavior of an employee. For this purpose, companies need to motivate their employees to become loyal to the organization; to fulfil the tasks for which they were hired; and to adopt creative, spontaneous, and innovative behaviours (Brown & Harvey, 2006; Kandilov & Vukina, 2016; Garb & Friedlander, 2014).

Indeed, in Nigeria, the major problem agrobusinesses face today is the efficient management of the initiatives of strategic change, and the fundamental difference between successful organizations and those that fail is the ability to keep up with change (Abdulquadri & Mohammed, 2012). Organizations when under the impact of a crisis and facing restructuring are often forced to rethink and reconsider what earlier promised profit and development (Sementelli, 2016). And then they ask themselves, are they capable of carrying out these new tasks? Achieving goals cannot ignore the capabilities and limitations of the individual members of a given organization, as improved organizational performance is largely due to effective management. Good leadership can provide the technical, human, informational, financial, organizational and motivational drivers required for greater productivity (Hyten, 2009; Plunkett et al., 2017).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset