Supplementing the Learning Management System: Using Web 2.0 for Collaboration, Communication, and Productivity in the Preparation of School Technology Leaders

Supplementing the Learning Management System: Using Web 2.0 for Collaboration, Communication, and Productivity in the Preparation of School Technology Leaders

Stephanie A. Jones (Georgia Southern University, USA), Lucilia Green (Georgia Southern University, USA), Charles B. Hodges (Georgia Southern University, USA), Kathryn Kennedy (Georgia Southern University, USA), Elizabeth Downs (Georgia Southern University, USA), Judi Repman (Georgia Southern University, USA) and Kenneth F. Clark (Georgia Southern University, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0014-0.ch009
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Abstract

This chapter describes how and why Web 2.0 tools are being used in a completely online M.Ed. program in Instructional Technology. Examples of specific tools and their implementation are provided along with the theoretical or pragmatic bases for their use. McGee and Diaz’s (2007) categories for Web 2.0 tools, documentative, communicative, generative, interactive, and collaborative, are used to structure the examples. A description of the evolution of the M.Ed. program and reasons for supplementing learning management systems with Web 2.0 tools establishes the context of the discussion.
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Terminology Used

Watson and Watson (2007) observed that the non-standardization of terminology such as content management system (CMS), learning management system (LMS), and various other names and acronyms for e-learning systems is confusing. Learning Management System and Course Management System have become interchangeable. Moodle is self-described as a “Course Management System (CMS), also known as a Learning Management System (LMS) or a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)” (Moodle.org, 2010). Blackboard now avoids any of these terms in their promotional literature and refers to its product as a “platform [emphasis added] for delivering learning content, engaging learners, and measuring their performance” (Blackboard Inc., 2010).

In this chapter, the authors will refer to a learning management system (LMS) as a system which instructors use to “provide their students with learning materials and activities while tracking participation and progress through data systems and assessments” (Falvo & Johnson, 2007, p. 40). The label Web 2.0 will be used as Oliver (2007) describes it: “an umbrella term for many individual tools that have been created with web collaboration, sharing, and/or new information creation in mind” (p. 55).

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