Sustainability in Higher Education through Basic Science Research: Strategies for Corporate Bodies in Pharmaceuticals

Sustainability in Higher Education through Basic Science Research: Strategies for Corporate Bodies in Pharmaceuticals

P. Yogeeswari (Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, India) and D. Sriram (Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, India)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-7363-2.ch035
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Abstract

Basic research in Universities is essential for a sustainable development. Recent developments in higher education have seen the inclusion of curiculum redesigned to serve the concept of developming young minds in the intrepretation, execution, and use of basic science research. The challenge for educators is to “demystify” research and teach in ways that are professionally meaningful as well as intellectually acceptable. The objective of this chapter is to bring in various case studies to prove the essentiality of basic research in higher education with specific concern over pharmaceutical industrial growth plans. Data on R&D in higher education can be broken down by field of science (natural sciences, engineering, medical sciences, agricultural sciences, social sciences, and humanities), by type of costs (current expenditures, capital expenditures), and by source of funds (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and funds from abroad). Measures of R&D performance in the higher education sector are often estimated by national authorities, and evaluation methods are periodically revised. It is necessary to review the design and conduct of higher education R&D surveys to improve the comparability of these indicators.
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Current Status Of Higher Education And Basic Research In India

A disquieting tendency in India and in many of the developing countries is the increasing disinterest in science among the younger generation. Many colleges are closing down science departments because students prefer to take courses in management, commerce, and related areas. And there are fewer bright students studying for careers in science and engineering research or higher education. This situation has to be remedied by promoting talent and by offering incentives. It is likely that the vast population of India and other developing countries harbors more than a few geniuses, possibly future Faradays and Newtons. But we have to find them and encourage them to pursue science.

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