“The Dialogue Triangle” Effect and Structure for Prototyping on “Need-Solution Pairs”: The Development of the “Naruse Pedal,” Which Prevents Mistakes When Stepping on a Vehicle Pedal

“The Dialogue Triangle” Effect and Structure for Prototyping on “Need-Solution Pairs”: The Development of the “Naruse Pedal,” Which Prevents Mistakes When Stepping on a Vehicle Pedal

Akimitsu Hirota (Kindai University, Japan)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 19
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-4775-4.ch014

Abstract

Problem-solving behavior in a situation where the problem is not defined creates problems. However, concrete examples of the phenomenon are not shown. In order to capture this phenomenon, the authors investigated the process of pedal development for automobiles. The name of the pedal is called “Naruse pedal.” Naruse pedal reduces accidents caused by mistakes in pressing foot on accelerator pedal and brake pedal. Naruse pedal has been reported by many media including the New York Times. The authors surveyed the development process of Naruse pedal. They show this development case and confirm the existence of simultaneity of needs and solution.
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Background

Many of the previous studies on product innovation focused on problem-solving behavior (Clark & Fujimoto, 1991; Ogawa, 2000; Lester & Piore, 2004). One reason for focusing on problem solving is the assumption that the problem to be solved is defined. However, in recent years, it has been noted that product development is conducted in a situation in which the problems are not clarified, creating a condition in which problem discovery and solving take place simultaneously (Ishii, 1993, 2009, 2014; Lester & Piore, 2004; Von Hippel & Von Krogh, 2016). Moreover, the importance of solving problems of which customers are unaware (that is, the importance of discovering problems creatively) has also been pointed out (Ishii 2009, 2014; Lester & Piore, 2004; Takaoka & Kotler, 2016).

Incidentally, the existence of users called “lead users” who act in advance of future important markets and their contribution to market creation has been noted (Von Hippel, 1988, 2005; Ogawa, 2000, 2013). Lead users have the characteristics of discovering problems that manufacturers and other users were unaware of and realizing innovation by solving these problems (meeting these needs) themselves.

In this study, the occurrence of simultaneous problem discovery and solving in a case study of product development by a lead user is confirmed. Second, the requirements to realize the simultaneous creation of problem discovery and solving in a situation where the problem has not been defined are considered from the viewpoint of dialogue (Ishii, 1993, 2009; Lester & Piore, 2004).

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