Developments of Environmental Certified Reference Material from the Brazilian Metrology Institute to Support National Traceability

Developments of Environmental Certified Reference Material from the Brazilian Metrology Institute to Support National Traceability

A.L. Fioravante (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), E.F. Guimarães (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil & Department of Chemistry, Military Institute of Engineering (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil), F.B. Gonzaga (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), C.M. Ribeiro (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), S.P. Sobral (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), J.C. Lopes (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), I.C.S. Fraga (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), C.R. Augusto (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), E.C.S. Elias (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), C.C. Ribeiro (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), D.C.G.S. Teixeira (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), E.C.P. Rego (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), L.M. Oliveira (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), E.B. Santana (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), L.A. Neves (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), R.R.R. Almeida (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), J.D. Figueroa-Villar (Department of Chemistry, Military Institute of Engineering (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil), R.C. Sena (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), M.A. Dominguez (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil), J.M. Rodrigues (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil) and V.S. Cunha (Chemical Metrology Division, Scientific and Industrial Metrology Directorate, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ, Brazil)
DOI: 10.4018/ijmtie.2013070101
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Abstract

This paper aims to present the developments performed by the Brazilian Metrology Institute (NMI) – Inmetro, considering the environmental demand. Inmetro addresses great part of its activities to the study of the traceability transference based on production and dissemination of certified reference material (CRM) of different areas in chemistry. It will be presented results from certification of the following reference materials developed: BTEX and PAH in solution, besides automotive emission gas mixtures and bioethanol. So, the achievements made are the growth in developing CRM, in order to support the needs of the national industry and to disseminate traceability among the society.
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1. Introduction

The results from chemical measurements form the main basis for decision-making in economic, political, environmental, medical or legal fields. The ongoing economic globalization requires that these results are reliable, comparable and traceable. The Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI), Inmetro, is a locus of knowledge and credibility, committed to the diffusion of metrology culture among society, as well as representation of the Country as international articulation. The Chemical Metrology Division from Inmetro (Dquim) has five (05) laboratories: Organic, Inorganic, Electrochemistry, Gases and Motor Laboratories. All these branches from Dquim plays an indispensable role, mainly towards the development of certified reference material (CRM), focusing the necessity concerning trustworthy and accurate chemical analysis.

Therefore, the importance of a NMI is to provide ways of supporting reliable measurements, in order to defend national interests, transpose technical barriers and ensuring fair terms to trade, supply harmonization and confidence todifferent sectors of society, aiming to develop products and /or services in the country with quality, innovation and competitiveness.

1.1. Certified Reference Material

Certified reference materials (CRM) is one the essential pillar of metrology in chemistry, as its use is an important tool in the implementation of various aspects of measurement quality and confidence. Another important observation is environmental legislation, that has significantly increased, and which requires international standards of comparison. These standards are essential to the realization of the SI units and, therefore, are indispensable for establishing traceability of measurements. Inmetro is mainly responsible for keeping the national metrological standards of reference, as well as for carrying and spread the SI units of measurement, and its harmonization on a global level, providing traceability to a large number of users via a metrological chain.

According to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) definition (ISO Guide 30, 2008), a reference material (RM) is a material, sufficiently homogeneous and stable with respect to one or more specified properties, which has been established to be fit for its intended use in a measurement process. A RM can be either a pure substance or a mixture of components. Certified Reference Material (CRM) is a reference material characterized by a metrologically valid procedure for one or more specified properties, accompanied by a certificate that provides the value of the specified property, its associated uncertainty, and a statement of metrological traceability. One or more parameters of a CRM can be determined and confirmed according to a specific procedure. To each certified parameter an uncertainty should be assigned at a given confidence level. Certificates are issued by recognized bodies.

The production is performed according to the ISO Guide 34 (ISO Guide 34, 2009) and ISO Guide 35 (ISO Guide 35, 2006) and includes studies of homogeneity, stability and characterization, and its respective estimation of uncertainties. The evaluation of the homogeneity is particularly important in cases where the substance to be measured is present in a complex matrix. The stability study is divided into short-term and long-term stability studies. The first simulates the conditions of transport and should address the factors involved at this stage that can affect the CRM, such as temperature and time. The results of this study show that the form of transport and packaging are appropriate to the material. In the study of long-term stability is developed to assess whether the material is stable during its period of validity conditions of storage. The variations observed during this period in the amount of the certified properties should be included in the determination of uncertainty. At the stage of characterization may be used the following methods: a primary method, two or more independent methods on a same laboratory, or by an interlaboratorial comparison using one or more validated methods of accuracy. These guides may provide the basis for future assessment of reference material producers.

So, the use of CRM ensures that the results obtained by different laboratories are comparable and traceable. In this context, CRM are essential in maintaining a system of universal and consistent measurements make it possible to compare the measured values from one laboratory to another, besides disseminating traceability among society.

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