Computer-Enhanced and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: Emerging Issues and Trends

Computer-Enhanced and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: Emerging Issues and Trends

Felicia Zhang (University of Canberra, Australia)
Indexed In: SCOPUS
Release Date: September, 2011|Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 288|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61350-065-1
ISBN13: 9781613500651|ISBN10: 1613500653|EISBN13: 9781613500668
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Description

As the field of Information and Communication Technologies rapidly expands, the applications to language learning continue to grow.

Computer-Enhanced and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: Emerging Issues and Trends compiles the latest research into computer-enhanced language learning, as well as the integration of mobile devices into new language acquisition. Though new information is constantly coming out as technologies continue to evolve, this important new follow-up publication will be distributed worldwide among academic and professional institutions and will be instrumental in providing researchers, scholars, students, and professionals access to the latest knowledge related to research on computer-enhanced and mobile assisted language learning.

Topics Covered

The many academic areas covered in this publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Information and Communication Technology
  • Language Acquisition
  • Lifelong Learning
  • LiveScribe Smart Pen
  • Mobile Learning
  • Mobile-Assisted Technology
  • NVivo 8
  • Social and Cognitive Constructivism
  • Web 2.0 Technology
  • Web Applications

Reviews and Testimonials

This important new follow-up publication will be distributed worldwide among academic and professional institutions and will be instrumental in providing researchers, scholars, students, and professionals access to the latest knowledge related to research on computer-enhanced and mobile assisted language learning. Contributions to this important publication have been received from scholars with notable research portfolios and expertise throughout the world.

– Felicia Zhang, University of Canberra, Australia

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Preface

Since the publication of the Handbook of Research on Computer-Enhanced Language Acquisition and Learning in 2008, information communication technology (ICT) has continued to create new learning paths to assist language learning. While CD-ROMs, multimedia computer labs, the World Wide Web, e-mail, and SMS still play an important part in language learning, research into the use of Web 2.0 technology (Fitzgerald, Barrass, Campbell, Hinton, Ryan, Whitelaw, Bruns, Miles, Steele, & McGinness, 2009) and Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) have become increasingly common. However, as pointed out by Kukulska-Hulme and Shield (2008), while mobile phones, PDAs, and other handheld devices such as iPods are frequently used devices in mobile learning, research in this area has been geared towards creating learning content for mobile devices rather than investigating how mobile devices can support listening and speaking activities. Therefore, research in the areas of contribution made by Web 2.0 and mobile technology to language teaching and learning is still in their infancy.

Computer-Enhanced and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: Emerging Issues and Trends
will be most helpful as it will provide a comprehensive coverage of successful translation of language learning designs utilizing ICT and mobile technology in practical learning contexts. This important new follow-up publication will be distributed worldwide among academic and professional institutions and will be instrumental in providing researchers, scholars, students, and professionals access to the latest knowledge related to research on computer-enhanced and mobile assisted language learning. Contributions to this important publication have been received from scholars with notable research portfolios and expertise throughout the world.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE CHAPTER SUBMISSIONS

The chapter submissions in this volume include many cases of successful international collaborations. In order to provide the best balanced coverage of research related to the selected topics of this handbook, researchers from around the world were asked to submit proposals. All proposals were carefully reviewed by the editor in light of their suitability, researcher’s records of similar work in the area of the proposed topics, and the best proposal for topics with multiple proposals. Researchers were asked to submit proposal according to the recommendation made by Mosteller, Nave, and Miech (2004, p.33) for structured abstracts. Upon the receipt of full entry submissions, each submission was forwarded to at least two expert external reviewers on a double-blind, peer review basis. Only submissions with strong and favorable reviews were selected for the handbook. In many cases, submissions were sent back for several revisions prior to final acceptance. As a result, this handbook includes 12 chapters highlighting current research conducted in the field of computer-enhanced and mobile language learning. The 12 submissions came from knowledgeable researchers around the world; while many submissions from the US were accepted (4 chapters), 4 chapters came from Australia, 2 from Thailand, 1 from Poland, and 1 from Denmark. Contributions involved a variety of contexts including such as tertiary education and schools. While the majority of the chapters involved empirical studies in the implementation of ICT and mobile technology for language learning, chapters that describe innovative use of mobile technology such as iPods, iPad, and Livescribe Smart Pen have also been included.

Heeding the inadequacies summarized by Hubbard (2005) and outlined previously, many of the chapters selected for publication are longitudinal in nature and employ both quantitative and qualitative evaluation instruments. In these chapters, whether ICT has been integrated within the overall design of the methodology used in the language learning process is a key factor. The international nature of this volume is demonstrated by the inclusion of many chapters that report on the learning of Thai, German, French, and English in foreign language learning contexts.

The diverse and comprehensive coverage of the interaction between language learning, ICT, and mobile language learning in this authoritative handbook will contribute to our understanding of how ICT can be successfully implemented in a variety of language learning contexts. The coverage of this handbook provides strength to this reference resource for language professionals who seek inspiration and new ideas to implement in their classrooms; equally, it is useful for researchers in applied linguistics who might want to replicate some of the studies reported in this handbook. For computer scientists, this handbook can also provide information on how to translate products from computer sciences to real life language learning contexts. It is our sincere hope that this publication and its great amount of information and research will assist our research colleagues or faculty, their students, and our organizational decision makers in enhancing their understanding of the language teaching and computer-enhanced language learning and acquisition fields.

REFERENCES

Fitzgerald, R., Barrass, S., Campbell, J., Hinton, S., Ryan, Y., Whitelaw, M., … McGinness, N. (2009). Digital learning communities (DLC): Investigating the application of social software to support networked learning. (CG6-36). Project Report.

Hubbard, P. (2005). A review of subject characteristics in CALL research. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 18(5), 351–368.

Kukulska-Hulme, A., & Shield, L. (2008). Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) special issue. ReCALL. Draft.

Mosteller, F., Nave, B., & Miech, E. J.  (2004). Why we need a structured abstract in
education research. Educational Researcher, 33(1), 29-34.

Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

Felicia Zhang possesses a Master of Arts degree in Applied Linguistics from the University of Melbourne, Australia; Holder of a Teaching English as a Foreign Language Certificate (TEFLA) issued by the Royal Society of Arts, United Kingdom; and a Doctorate in Education from the University of Canberra. She is currently a senior lecturer in Applied Linguistics and Chinese at the University of Canberra, Australia. Her research interests include the use of active learning techniques in foreign language teaching, the use of technology in language teaching and acquisition, e-learning, integrating computer technology in curriculum design in education. She has just completed an Australian Learning and Teaching Council grant on science education which also won her and her team at the University of Canberra, Australia, a University of Canberra Teaching Award for Programs that Enhanced Learning. She published the “Handbook of research on computer-enhanced Language Acquisition and Learning” in 2008. She is also the 2003 winner of Australian Awards for University Teaching.

Indices