A Comparative Analysis of Educational Policy for Citizenship Following Political Transitions: A Case Study of Egypt, Nepal, and Hong Kong

A Comparative Analysis of Educational Policy for Citizenship Following Political Transitions: A Case Study of Egypt, Nepal, and Hong Kong

Ericka Galegher (Lehigh University, USA), Maureen F. Park (Lehigh University, USA), Angel Oi Yee Cheng (Lehigh University, USA), Petrina M. Davidson (Lehigh University, USA) and Alexander W. Wiseman (Texas Tech University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7110-0.ch005

Abstract

This chapter provides a comparative policy analysis of education for citizenship in Egypt, Nepal, and Hong Kong. Having undergone significant political transitions, these countries provide useful case studies for examining the policy borrowing process for citizenship education before and after significant regime change. Using comparative policy discourse analysis framed by Phillips and Ochs's policy borrowing model, the authors examine the intersections between international expectations with national policy around citizenship education in countries which experienced drastic political transitions. This comparative policy analysis seeks to answer the following questions: How has national level policy on education for citizenship changed before and after shifts in regime governance? How are the examples of Egypt, Nepal, and Hong Kong reflective of global trends in citizenship education?
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International Discourse On Education For Citizenship

Citizenship education has been an embedded in educational systems since the beginning of universal public education, as schools were often sites for the development of a nation’s future citizenry (Tawil & Harley, 2004; Thornton, 2008; Westheimer, & Kahne, 1998; Wiseman, Astiz, Fabrega, & Baker, 2010). While this may take the form of a specific class, it also refers to promoting values related to individuals’ societal roles (Waddell, 2013) and the institutionalization of political knowledge, values, and attitudes (El-Naggar & Smolska, 2009). Using the case of post-conflict Guatemala, Rubin (2016) argues that citizenship education is a “common prescription” to rebuild or develop democracy, especially as education is considered essential to creating “peaceful, tolerant, and democratic civic identities” (p.639).

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