Chaotic-Based and Biologically Inspired Cryptosystems for Secure Image Communication and Storage

Chaotic-Based and Biologically Inspired Cryptosystems for Secure Image Communication and Storage

El-Sayed M. El-Alfy (King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9426-2.ch004
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Abstract

Protecting confidentiality of sensitive data is growing in importance in many personal, commercial, governmental, medical and military applications. Data encryption remains the most prevalent mechanism for this goal in cybersecurity to store and communicate data in unintelligible form. However, images are known to have intrinsic characteristics different from text, which limit the applicability of conventional cryptographic algorithms. This chapter provides a review of the work related to image cryptosystems based on chaos theory and biologically-inspired algorithms. Then, a case study is presented using ideas from genetic crossover and mutation to confuse and diffuse images to generate secure cipher images with very low correlation between pixels.
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Background: Chaos Theory

Over years since the early work of Herni Poincare in 1890, several attempts have been made toward developing understating of behavioral patterns associated with complex natural phenomena that are apparently unpredictable in the long term (Ditto and Munakata, 1995; Ott, 2002). Common characteristics of such phenomena are recurrence and extreme sensitivity to initial conditions, which is popularly referred to as a butterfly effect (this term is coined by Edward Lorenz to describe the potential influence on a hurricane caused by flapping the wings of a distant butterfly). Various systems have been investigated in the discrete and continuous time domains. Among the popular chaotic systems are:

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