Civic Knowledge, Engagement, and Attitudes Among Lower-Secondary Students in 24 Countries: Results From ICCS 2016

Civic Knowledge, Engagement, and Attitudes Among Lower-Secondary Students in 24 Countries: Results From ICCS 2016

Wolfram Schulz (Australian Council for Education Research (ACER), Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7110-0.ch001

Abstract

The ICCS 2016 study is a continuation and extension of ICCS 2009. The study explored the enduring and the emerging challenges of educating young people in a world where contexts of democracy and civic participation had changed and continue to change. In total, ICCS 2016 is based on test and questionnaire data from more than 94,000 students enrolled in their eighth year of schooling (Grade 8 or equivalent) at more than 3,800 schools in 24 countries. These student data were augmented by contextual questionnaire data from school principals of selected schools and more than 37,000 teachers.
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Background, Study Design And Research Questions

Civic and citizenship education aims to provide young people with the knowledge, understanding, and dispositions necessary for successful participation as citizens in society. It is meant to support emerging citizens by promoting their understanding and engagement with society’s principles and institutions, their development and exercise of informed critical judgment, and their learning about and appreciation of citizens’ rights and responsibilities. All these attributes are key to a proper functioning of a democracy, where citizens are thought of as actively involved agents when it comes to decision-making, governance, and change, in contrast to non-democratic regimes where their role is rather one of passive subjects. There has been a long tradition emphasis on the essential relationship between education and democracy in scholarly work on educational policy and practice (see, for example, Dewey, 1916).

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