Countering RSA Vulnerabilities and Its Replacement by ECC: Elliptic Curve Cryptographic Scheme for Key Generation

Countering RSA Vulnerabilities and Its Replacement by ECC: Elliptic Curve Cryptographic Scheme for Key Generation

Behnam Rahnama (ScaleDB Inc., USA), Arif Sari (Girne American University, Cyprus) and Marwan Yassin Ghafour (Sulaimani Polytechnic University, Iraq)
Copyright: © 2016 |Pages: 43
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8761-5.ch012
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Abstract

Security is utilized to keep the information safe. Online resources, e-commerce, internet banking and a lot of similar services are protected by use of well-known protocols such as Secure Socket Layer (SSL). This protocol makes use of the RSA key exchange protocol for authentication. New innovations and boost ups in the computational power of supercomputers today makes it quite easier than before to break through RSA and consequently decrypt the payload transferred over SSL. In this research demonstrates the use of SSL; how to utilize it in the best shape? We also discuss reasons of why we need to improve its strength. The proposed solution is to replace the RSA key exchange mechanism utilized in SSL with Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC).
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Introduction

In many life situations, we have private information that necessitates protection from illegal access. In order to give protection to our sensitive information and avoid any unauthorized access to it, the digital world offers us techniques using cryptography.

The aim of cryptography is to give protection to information while it is being transmitted between two parties, and avoiding access to any third illegitimate party who attempts to obtain a part of it through prohibited means. Our aim is to improve current methods of combating such hackers aiming to obtain unauthorized access.

In the digital world, many applications and situations benefit from cryptography. Just a small selection includes but not limited to ATMs, SSL web based applications within browsers, authentication and authorization acceptance and server-client applications, military services, electronic commerce and satellite communication (Stallings, 2005; Cole, et al., 2008).

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