Internet Consumer Behavior: Behavioral Variables

Internet Consumer Behavior: Behavioral Variables

Marie-Odile Richard (University of Montreal, Canada) and Michel Laroche (Concordia University, Canada)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-611-7.ch064
OnDemand PDF Download:
$37.50

Abstract

In the previously, the authors covered the major stimulus variables, i.e., flow, emotions and web atmospherics, which impact the organism and response variables of the model. This chapter now covers some behavioral variables as indicated in the shaded areas of Figure 1.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

In the previously, the authors covered the major stimulus variables, i.e., flow, emotions and web atmospherics, which impact the organism and response variables of the model. This chapter now covers some behavioral variables as indicated in the shaded areas of Figure 1.

Figure 1.

Model of consumer navigation behavior: behavioral variables (Source: Adapted from Richard, M.O. (2009). Modeling the internet behavior of visitors by the study of cognitive variables and moderators. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, HEC-Montreal Business School.)

Top

Background

The key behavioral variables identified by the literature are: exploratory behavior, site attitude, product attitude, site involvement and product involvement. This chapter will define them and explain their roles in the model.

Exploratory Behavior

Exploratory behavior is defined as a behavior with the unique function of changing the stimulus field (Berlyne, 1963). Raju (1980) lists risk taking, innovativeness, brand switching, repetitive behavior proneness, information seeking, exploration through shopping and interpersonal communication as aspects of exploratory consumer behavior. There are several specific types of exploratory behavior: innovative behavior (Foxall, 1986), cognitive responses to ads (Faison, 1977), and curiosity-motivated search for product information (Hirschman, 1980).

Studies suggest a two-factor conceptualization of exploratory consumer buying behavior: exploratory acquisition of products and exploratory information seeking (Baumgartner & Steenkamp, 1996). Browsing, one form of exploratory behavior, is performed when surfers do not have knowledge of available information, are not sure whether their requirements can be met or how these requirements may be achieved. Browsing is either general or purposeful. Purposive browsing occurs when surfers have specific requirements, whereas general browsing is an opportunity for surfers to fine-tune the perceptions of their requirements or simply keep themselves up-to-date on the latest changes in a field or product type (Rowley, 2000).

Exploratory behavior by site visitors influences their site attitudes. The more they explore the possibilities offered by the site, the more they fine-tune their requirements and have a positive idea of the site they visit, triggering approach behavior.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Product involvement: degree of interest in a product on an ongoing basis.

Product attitude: predisposition to answer favorably or not to a product in a consistent manner.

Situational involvement: degree of interest in a specific situation or occasion.

Site attitude: predisposition to answer favorably or not to a particular website in a consistent manner.

Peripheral cues: Peripheral processes use simple decision rules, conditioning processes, mere-exposure processes, and others not involving scrutiny of central merits of the object.

Site involvement: degree of interest in a specific website.

Exploratory behavior: behavior with the sole function of changing the stimulus field.

Involvement: a motivational state influenced by perceptions of the object’s relevance based on inherent needs, values and interests.

Enduring involvement: degree of interest in a product on an ongoing basis.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset