Learner-Centered Technology Integration

Learner-Centered Technology Integration

Yun-Jo An (Yun-Jo AnUniversity of West Georgia, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61350-068-2.ch058
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Abstract

To transform teaching and learning in ways that better meet the needs of digital natives, there has been increased emphasis on the integration of technology into teaching and learning. However, despite generally improved conditions for technology integration, high-level technology use, associated with constructivist or learner-centered practices, is still low. Many teachers and instructors are not using technologies to their potential, often integrating the new tools into their old practices. In an attempt to better support teachers and instructors in using emerging technologies to design and facilitate learner-centered instruction (LCI), this chapter provides an overview of learner-centered instruction (LCI) and the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) framework. Then, the potential of emerging technologies to foster learner-centered instruction (LCI) and future trends are discussed.
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Introduction

Today’s students, often called “digital natives, grow up with technology. They integrate technology into almost everything they do and are constantly connected to their friends, family and various resources via technology. Most of them have never known life without the internet. They have spent their entire lives using computers, cell phones, and other digital tools. Technology is an integral part of their lives (Oblinger, 2008; Prensky, 2007). To transform teaching and learning in ways that better meet the needs of these digital natives, there has been increased emphasis on the integration of technology into teaching and learning. Many educators and researchers in diverse contexts are exploring innovative ways to use emerging technologies in teaching and learning.

However, high-level technology use, associated with constructivist or learner-centered practices, is still low. Despite generally improved conditions for technology integration, including increased access to technology and increased training and resources, many teachers and instructors are not using technologies to their potential. Researchers report that teachers tend to use technology mostly for communication and low-level tasks, such as word processing, drill and practice activities, and exploring websites, rather than using technology to facilitate learner-centered instruction (Becker, 2000; Brush & Saye, 2009; Ertmer, 2005; Russell, Bebell, O’Dwyer, & O’Connor, 2003; U.S. Department of Education, 2003). In an attempt to better support teachers and instructors in using emerging technologies to design and facilitate learner-centered instruction, this chapter provides an overview of learner-centered instruction (LCI) and the framework for teacher knowledge for technology integration, which is called technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK). The potential of emerging technologies, such as Web 2.0, virtual worlds, and wireless handheld devices (WHDs), to foster LCI, will then be discussed. Finally, future trends and directions for professional development will be briefly discussed.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Mixed Reality (MR): The blending of real and virtual worlds. Encompasses both augmented reality (AR) and augmented virtuality (AV).

Learner-centered Technology Integration: Using technology in support of learner-centered instruction.

Augmented Reality (AR): A situation in which a real world context is overlaid or augmented with virtual objects or information.

Web 2.0: The read/write web that facilitates user participation, knowledge sharing, social networking, and collaboration.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK): A framework that illustrates the knowledge needed by teachers for effective technology integration.

Learner-centered instruction (LCI): An approach to teaching that focuses on both the learner and learning. Major features of LCI includes personalized learning, social and emotional support, self-regulation, authentic tasks, and collaboration.

Augmented Virtuality (AV): A situation in which a virtual world is augmented with real-world objects or information.

Virtual World: An online environment in which users act and interact with others as avatars.

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