Open Educational Sky for Networking and Partnership: Studies in Tourism Courses

Open Educational Sky for Networking and Partnership: Studies in Tourism Courses

G. S. L. Devra (Vardhman Mahavir Open University, India)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1880-8.ch006
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Abstract

At present the size of the demand of the higher education is so large that no country in the world can afford to meet it with a single system of delivery. Higher education requires such a plan of action that may serve the requirements of several social categories simultaneously along with a capacity of meeting the targets of both inside and outside world. So we need a broad based partnership strategy. Besides science and technical subjects, we could include the studies of language, manners, traditions and customs. The study of tourism is an emerging concept and it alone is expected to create employment for 262 million people. So to begin with in the areas where social and cultural similarities are in one or another form already exist combined efforts can be initiated in this direction. In the proposed study, some points for the Curriculum for different sets of the courses are being proposed. It also covers the general guidelines for the conduct of the training sessions and set the norms for the preparation of their material. The adjustment and allotment of the credits in favor of the courses of different categories along with admission norms are other areas of concern.
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Introduction

At present the size of the demand of the higher education is so large that no country in the world can afford to meet it with a single system of delivery. Moreover, most of the developing and under developed countries are finding it hard to come across through the highly competitive economy and culture of the outside world. In these countries the statistics of the educational standards do not match with their level of work force, too. For example, in India around ten percent of its entire population goes for the higher or skilled education. In contrast to that 36% of the population stands for the work force of it. And the work force percentage, in turn, is chiefly distributed only in the three major areas of economic activities, i.e., agriculture (60% in 2000 to 50% in 2013), Industry (16%in 2000 to 21% in 2013) and services (24% in 2000 to 29% in 2013). International labour organization states “Education, vocational training and lifelong learning are central pillars of employability, employment of workers and sustainable enterprise development”. India presently faces severe paucity of highly-trained, quality labour, and non-employability of large sections of the educated workforce that possess little or no job skills (FICCI, 2015, UGC, 2001; India Development report, 2002). So far the student enrolment in the higher education is concerned between the age group of 20 to 24 only 5% of it prefers vocational and professional programs. This situation which is not uncommon in the other Asian countries, poses the pertinent questions, like, whether this level of higher education is the outcome of uneven economic development so far planned or does it came out as a result from the cultural behavior of their highly stratified tradition bound society.

Over the past few years, in most of the developing countries of Asia and Africa foreign universities and educational institutions have come to play an important role. Soon the educational sky will be opened in all terms as per the spirit of WTO and GATT agreements (Moran and Mugridge, 1993a; 1993b; Arunachalam, 2010). Economic factors, like demand for a modern, mobile global labor force and managerial expertise and also joint international research and development projects in the field of new technologies will raise this momentum but to shortlist these phenomena in terms of export commodity or commercial products would only restrict the process of general development both in terms of thought and action. Simultaneously, the tendency of raising the slogan for a National policy for internationalization of higher education is virtually a shift from educational, economic and cultural rationale to commercial factors or is a desperate effort to close the windows for all seasonal winds. Again, how would accreditation or quality control be carried out under such intervention is another area of concern (Caston, 1996, Govinda, 2002)

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