The Nurse Educator's Role in Designing Instruction and Instructional Strategies for Academic and Clinical Settings

The Nurse Educator's Role in Designing Instruction and Instructional Strategies for Academic and Clinical Settings

Patricia J. Slagter van Tryon (East Carolina University, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2098-6.ch006
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Nursing education programs seeking to equip graduates with needed tools to integrate medical expertise with experience in the systematic design of instruction have the opportunity to better ensure positive learning outcomes in varied settings as graduates take on their new roles as nurse educators. The learning environment of the nurse educator is complex yet with skill in the reasoned approach to the design of instruction can progress into more knowable contexts for which to problem solve. Nurse educators possessing interdisciplinary skills in their field facilitated by expertise in instructional design will enhance their practice by developing and delivering precision instruction.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

In considering that a consistently reported mission of Master’s degree programs in Nursing Education is to prepare its graduates for the role of nurse educator in a highly dynamic academic setting as well as in complex clinical settings, it may be efficacious to move a step beyond the linear curriculum development model that many programs maintain as a core element in informing the nurse educator’s practice. Further, and specific to the mission in nurse educator programs, precision in the design of instruction may serve to support confidence in addressing emergent technologies that require a skilled approach in practice, support effective communication in assessment, and help to develop highly efficient problem solving skills in a demanding interdependent work environment. Each of these areas offer support in leadership as nurses gain needed confidence in areas where they may be called upon to lead however potentially feel unprepared to do so (Ashton, 2012).

A deeper understanding of the instructional process and the environment for which the learning takes place mirrors the reasoned decision process nurses must engage in consistently and efficiently each day of their practice. Without focused skill building in a reasoned approach to the design and delivery of instruction, nursing education programs may fall short of their goal of equipping future nurse educators with the needed tools to integrate their medical expertise with experience in high quality design of instruction that might better ensure positive learning outcomes for their own learners in the varied settings in which they will teach.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset