Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0: The Development of E-Business

Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0: The Development of E-Business

Tobias Kollmann (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany) and Carina Lomberg (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-611-7.ch121
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Abstract

Both, Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 were linked directly to new stages in the development of e-business. Whereas the distinction between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 became widely accepted in literature and practice, we are merely at the beginning of the possibilities arising from current trends culminating in our information society. Information emerges increasingly as a major factor of production, allowing the activation of innovative business opportunities. However, over the past years, a sheer explosion of supplies has taken place. This development is both a blessing and a curse as it leads to an oversupply of information within the World Wide Web. Thus, the time needed for finding required information may take longer eventually. Therefore, a next generation technology is needed being capable to cope with these challenges. Due to the logic of this chain of ideas, Web 3.0 technologies are characterized particularly by demand-orientated systems, i.e. demand for objects and services are at the centre. Starting point are demand-driven registration and specification systems. The consumer is at the centre of these processes and will gain individual help, comparable to an information desk. Not only information but also individual products and services may be released (customized products).
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Introduction

Both, Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 were linked directly to new stages in the development of e-business. Whereas the distinction between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 became widely accepted in literature and practice, we are merely at the beginning of the possibilities arising from current trends culminating in our information society. Information emerges increasingly as a major factor of production, allowing the activation of innovative business opportunities. However, over the past years, a sheer explosion of supplies has taken place. This development is both a blessing and a curse as it leads to an oversupply of information within the World Wide Web. Thus, the time needed for finding required information may take longer eventually. Therefore, a next generation technology is needed being capable to cope with these challenges. Due to the logic of this chain of ideas, Web 3.0 technologies are characterized particularly by demand-orientated systems, i.e. demand for objects and services are at the centre. Starting point are demand-driven registration and specification systems. The consumer is at the centre of these processes and will gain individual help, comparable to an information desk. Not only information but also individual products and services may be released (customized products).

Against the background of an increasing information overload, the question to be asked is how technological and market-oriented future developments will cope with these challenges. This paper aims at clarifying this overall development with the objective of giving impulses for the 3rd generation of e-business. For this purpose, the characteristics of each generation (Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0) are clearly highlighted.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Web 2.0: Web 2.0 describes membership-orientated information-, communication-, and transaction processes within the Net Economy. Due to these processes, the network via profile-orientated databases represents the starting point for related e-networking-processes predominantly carried out by means of e-community platforms.

E-procurement: E-procurement enables the electronic purchasing of products and services from a company via digital networks. Using the integration of innovative information and communication technologies, e-procurement supports and concludes, respectively, both operative and strategic tasks in the area of procurement.

Web 3.0: Web 3.0 describes demand-orientated information-, communication-, and transaction processes within the Net Economy. Due to these processes, the consumer and the demand via individual registration-, and specification systems represent the starting point for related e-request-, and e-customization processes predominantly carried out by means of e-desk (request) or modified e-shop platforms.

E-Shop: An e-shop allows for electronic sales of products and services by a company using digital networks. Using innovative information and communication technologies, e-shops support and conclude operative and strategic tasks for the area of sales.

E-marketplace: An e-marketplace enables electronic trade with products and/or services via digital networks. This represents the integration of innovative information and communication technologies to support and conclude, respectively, the matching process of the supply and demand sides.

Web 1.0: Web 1.0 describes supply-orientated information-, communication- and transaction processes within the Net Economy. Due to these processes, the supplier and the supply via object-orientated databases constitutes the starting point for related e-offer-, e-sales-, and e-trading-processes predominantly carried out by means of e-procurement, e-shop, and e-marketplace platforms.

E-Entrepreneurship: E-entrepreneurship refers to establishing a new company with an innovative business idea within the Net Economy, which, using an electronic platform in data networks, offers its products and/or services based upon a purely electronic creation of value. Essentially, this value offer was only made possible through the development of information technology.

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