Wild Plants Used as a Forest Ecosystem Services by the Local Inhabitants of Champawat District of Uttarakhand to the Subsistence of Their Livelihood

Wild Plants Used as a Forest Ecosystem Services by the Local Inhabitants of Champawat District of Uttarakhand to the Subsistence of Their Livelihood

Kapil Kharkwal (India Post, India), Dalip Kumar Mansotra (Gurukul Kangri University, India) and Bhupendra Singh Bhandari (HNB Garhwal University, India)
Copyright: © 2020 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-1320-0.ch014

Abstract

This chapter deals with scientific information about the wild socioeconomic plants used by the local inhabitants of the Champawat district of Uttarakhand for the enhancement of their livelihood. During this entire study, it was observed and documented that poor rural people of this area are educationally and financially backward, and they do not have any permanent source of income; due to this reason they are unable to fulfill their necessary requirements. Therefore, they are totally dependent on various forest ecosystem services, viz., selling prepared herbal medicines, wild edible fruits, and wild ornamental plants, etc., which shares approximately 45-50% of their total annual income and plays a vital role for the upliftment of their livelihood. During this research work, a total of 63 plant species belonging to 58 genera under 46 families have been documented, which are being used as livelihood resources by the locals of this area.
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Materials And Methods

The research work was carried out in the Champawat district of Kumaun Himalaya, Uttarakhand during the years 2017–2018. In this research work, different places in the Champawat district and its nearby areas, namely, Pancheshwar, Munch, Tamli, Mudiyani, Pokhari, Kharhi, and Pati were regularly surveyed for the documentation of economic plant resources of this area. During this survey period, a number of local fruit vendors, natives (older household members and women), farmers, and experienced personnel in the forest department were interviewed. Group discussion and other participatory methods were also used to learn about the economic uses of these plants used by local peoples. Necessary permissions have been taken from the forest department for the collection and documentation of plant specimens. Plants collected during the survey period have been properly processed as per the standard method given by Jain and Rao (1976). Some plant specimens were identified in the field, and others were identified by matching them with authenticated specimens housed at the BSD herbarium, Dehradun. Asterisk marks (*) indicate that information was gathered by local peoples.

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