Talia Raphaely

Dr Talia Raphaely Originally from Cape Town, South Africa, Talia has 30 years of international experience in behavioural and attitudinal change, communications and diverse media, sustainability awareness and consciousness and collaboration and partnership building for increasing sustainable outcomes. She has worked closely with multicultural and heterogeneous groups in a diverse array of organizational settings, including academia, media, research-based organisations, government bodies, non-government organisations, community-based organisations and industry. Talia currently works as an academic at the Curtin University Sustainability and Policy (CUSP) Institute in Perth, Western Australia and continues to undertake consultancy research work relating to sustainability. She is recognised for her work on flexitarianism (reducing meat consumption to within healthy levels as recommended by national and international guidelines), collaboration, empowerment and sustainability humanistic education.

Publications

Handbook of Research on Social Marketing and Its Influence on Animal Origin Food Product Consumption
Diana Bogueva, Dora Marinova, Talia Raphaely. © 2018. 453 pages.
As marketing professionals look for more effective ways to promote their goods and services to customers, a thorough understanding of customer needs and the ability to predict a...
Taxing Meat and Animal Food Products
Dora Marinova, Talia Raphaely. © 2018. 14 pages.
This chapter develops the argument for taxing meat and animal-based products higher than other foods because of their negative effects on both human health and the environment....
Marketing an Environmentally Sustainable Catering Model: A Case Study of Medley Hall Residential College in Victoria, Australia
Emily Foenander, Celia Green, Linda Portsmouth, Talia Raphaely. © 2018. 16 pages.
This chapter presents a novel case study of a diet sustainability model implemented at Medley Hall, an on-campus student accommodation facility at a university in Victoria...
Meat Marketing Dissonance: A South African Case Study
Erin Hill, Talia Raphaely. © 2018. 12 pages.
This chapter discusses a South African supermarket's print advertisement promoting meat consumption for a national public holiday. Meat consumption is portrayed as symbolic...
The Future of Antibiotics and Meat
Talia Raphaely, Dora Marinova, Mira Marinova. © 2017. 23 pages.
This chapter discusses antibiotic use in the livestock industry and potential ramifications for human health. Antibiotics are routinely administered to food animals, primarily at...
Impact of Meat Consumption on Health and Environmental Sustainability
Talia Raphaely, Dora Marinova. © 2016. 410 pages.
Meat consumption impacts all aspects of human life and humanity’s long-term survival prospects. Despite this knowledge, society continues to ignore the negative impact of...
The Future of Antibiotics and Meat
Talia Raphaely, Dora Marinova, Mira Marinova. © 2016. 23 pages.
This chapter discusses antibiotic use in the livestock industry and potential ramifications for human health. Antibiotics are routinely administered to food animals, primarily at...
China's Growing Meat Demands: Implications for Sustainability
Xiumei Guo, Talia Raphaely, Dora Marinova. © 2016. 11 pages.
The chapter examines China's growing meat demand and its implications. Australia and China are currently set to expand trade in meat and livestock facilitated by a government...
Meat Production and Consumption: An Ethical Educational Approach
Paula Brügger, Dora Marinova, Talia Raphaely. © 2016. 17 pages.
This chapter presents the results of studies that unveil how meat and other animal derived products are causing severe environmental impacts, social problems and ethical concerns...
Flexitarianism (Flexible or Part-Time Vegetarianism): A User-Based Dietary Choice for Improved Wellbeing
Talia Raphaely, Dora Marinova, George Crisp, Jordan Panayotov. © 2013. 25 pages.
Many think that eating meat is nutritionally necessary and beneficial. Industrialising livestock production provides meat that is often “cheaper” than fruit and vegetables. In...