Assistive and Augmentive Communication for the Disabled: Intelligent Technologies for Communication, Learning and Teaching
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Assistive and Augmentive Communication for the Disabled: Intelligent Technologies for Communication, Learning and Teaching

Lau Bee Theng (Swinburne University of Technology, Malaysia)
Indexed In: SCOPUS View 2 More Indices
Release Date: May, 2011|Copyright: © 2011 |Pages: 344
ISBN13: 9781609605414|ISBN10: 1609605411|EISBN13: 9781609605421|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-541-4

Description

Assistive and augmentive communication is an emerging research area receiving much support from the disabled community. It enables communication for those with impairments or restrictions on the production or comprehension of spoken or written language.

Assistive and Augmentive Communication for the Disabled: Intelligent Technologies for Communication, Learning and Teaching provides benefits to the professionals and researchers working in various disciplines in the field, such as special education, healthcare, computational intelligence and information technology. Moreover, this book provides insights and support to individuals who are concerned with the development of children and adults with disabilities. It covers recently completed studies, as well as ongoing research, to provide a cutting-edge window into this area of promising, new applications.

Topics Covered

The many academic areas covered in this publication include, but are not limited to:

  • 3D Assistive Technologies
  • Assisting Children with Cerebral Palsy
  • Assisting Social Skills
  • Blended Learning
  • Collaboration
  • Face Based Real Time Communication
  • ICT to Assist Visually Impaired People
  • Spatial Knowledge Communication
  • Statistical Analysis of Facial Expression
  • Wireless Healthcare Monitoring System

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Preface

Assistive and augmentive communication (AAC) is an emerging area that receives much support from the disabled community. It enables communication for those with impairments or restrictions on the production or comprehension of spoken or written language. There are unaided and aided AAC systems. Unaided systems do not require any external device for their use, but include facial expression, vocalizations, gestures, and signed languages. On the other hand, an aided AAC uses either an electronic or non-electronic device to transmit messages such as communication books or voice output devices using symbols. Since the skills, areas of difficulty, and communication requirements of AAC users vary greatly, an equally diverse range of communication aids and devices exists to meet these demands.  For the low-tech aided AAC, communication is done through letters, words, phrases, pictures, and/or symbols on a board or in a book for access. As for high-tech aided AAC, electronic devices with storage and retrieval of messages allow the user to communicate with others using recorded speech output. There are high-tech aided AAC which use dedicated devices developed solely for communication, and non-dedicated devices, such as computers, adapted for use as communication with some external devices and software packages.

AAC has been a great assistance to people with cerebral palsy, autism, brainstem stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other disabilities. It helps them to learn, communicate, and gain social abilities. For young children, it develops their vocabulary from scratch and helps them learn the speech proficiency to go to school, improve their literacy, and gain employability in the market. Foremost, it improves the quality of their life.

There are many AAC tools being developed by various industry giants being distributed to fit into the general public needs. In fact, there are various niche researches going on in the research institutions, universities, and non-profit organizations that have not been publicized or commercialized widely. Hence, we gathered the recently completed and ongoing research in AAC and shared them with other researchers.  All the chapters were peer-reviewed by  members of our editorial board before they were accepted.

We anticipate this book will benefit professionals and researchers working in the field of assistive and augmentative technology in various disciplines, such as special education, healthcare, computational intelligence, and Information Technology. Moreover, the book also provides insights and support to individuals who are concerned with the development of children and adult with disabilities.

Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

Lau Bee Theng is a senior lecturer at Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak Campus. She obtained her PhD from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak in 2005. Her research interests are in the areas of assistive and alternative tools for communication and learning mainly focus on disabled children. She has authored several papers in refereed journals and international conferences.

Indices

Editorial Board

  • Lee Seldon, Multimedia University, Malaysia
  • Ong Chin Ann, Swinburne University of Technology, Malaysia
  • Marlene Valerie Lu, Swinburne University of Technology, Malaysia
  • Nia Valeria, Swinburne University of Technology, Malaysia
  • Justo A. Diaz, University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Wang Yin Chai, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Malaysia
  • Bong Chin Wei, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Lee Bee Wah, Cambodia Methodist International School, Cambodia