Dictionary of Information Science and Technology (2 Volumes)

Dictionary of Information Science and Technology (2 Volumes)

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A. (Information Resources Management Association, USA)
Release Date: November, 2006|Copyright: © 2007 |Pages: 1018
ISBN13: 9781599043852|ISBN10: 1599043858|EISBN13: 9781599043869|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-385-2

Description

The Dictionary of Information Science and Technology is the premier, comprehensive reference source compiled of the latest terms and definitions related to all aspects of the information science and technology field. This complete and timely collection of approximately 10,000 terms and acronyms provides researchers, practitioners, educators, and students with the most accurate and up-to-date knowledge of key words in the ever-expanding world of information science and technology.

Terms and definitions included in this important reference publication were contributed by over 2,500 noted researchers from over 40 countries. There is no single definition in existence for each element of the vocabulary, so individual researchers have formed distinctive descriptions of the terminology, providing a much more meaningful and broader understanding of each term. The Dictionary of Information Science and Technology is a valuable, essential reference publication for libraries and individuals worldwide.

Topics Covered

The many academic areas covered in this publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Accounting information systems
  • Communities of Practice
  • Data warehousing and mining
  • Database technologies and applications
  • Decision Support Systems
  • Distance Learning
  • E-commerce, e-government and mobile commerce
  • End User Computing
  • Global IT Management
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Information and Communication Technology
  • IT Business Value
  • IT Personnel
  • Knowledge Management
  • Literacy in technology
  • Mobile computing and commerce
  • Multimedia
  • Software Engineering
  • Strategic IT management
  • Virtual communities and technologies
  • Web Technologies

Reviews and Testimonials

"The comprehensive coverage of thousands of terms and acronyms provided in this two-volume resource will contribute to a better understanding of the technical and managerial language available and its applications for the field of information science and technology."

– Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Information Resources Management Association

"This online dictionary contains more than 9,700 entries from a variety of sources, covering topics such as knowledge management, database technologies, distance learning, multimedia and networking, and more. The site's layout is uncomplicated, and search boxes are easy to use. For a field that changes as rapidly as information science and technology, this resource can be a very nice addition, or alternatively to print, for any academic reference collection. Recommended."

– CHOICE, Vol. 45, No. 3 (2007)

The Dictionary of Information Science and Technology is comprised of 2 volumes containing over 10,000 unique terms, acronyms, and definitions relating to all aspects of the information science and technology field. This dictionary and any subsequent editions or revisions, will be useful in large university reference collections and is recommended for all libraries supporting library and information science programs.

– American Reference Books Annual, Vol. 39

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Preface

During the past few decades, considerable advancements of computer technologies, combined with innovations achieved in telecommunication technologies, have served as fuel for the formation of a new discipline, known today as information science and technology (IST). Since its inception, IST has grown to encompass many other specific areas within the field itself, allowing the IST domain of studies to expand exponentially. Moreover, the primary focus of IST as a discipline is broadening the science of information processing, management, and dissemination. This newly developed scientific paradigm is comprised of many resources and components, including: (1) type of information; (2) computer hardware technologies; (3) computer software technologies; (4) telecommunication technologies; (5) technology applications; (6) information processing systems structures; (7) systems personnel and management; (8) end users; and (9) management skills and programs (Khosrow-Pour & Yaverbaum, 1990). In recent years, the IST revolution has globally impacted all aspects of life at the individual, organizational, and societal level. In many ways, IST has been the principal driving force behind the second industrial revolution, known as the digital revolution.

The expansion of IST as a science, like other scientific fields, such as medicine, has created a new language filled with terminologies, key words, and acronyms unique to IST and its specific disciplines. Furthermore, the sheer volume of ongoing discoveries of new technologies and applications, as well as transpiring research findings, continue to expand the list of terminology associated with the field of IST. Because of these incessant advancements, it is nearly impossible to maintain an understanding of the jargon related to IST and its peripheral domains of study without comprehending its emerging technological vernacular.

To provide the most comprehensive coverage of IST language, the idea of a new Dictionary of Information Science and Technology was formed to provide the most in-depth and complete introduction to all terms, acronyms, and definitions related to some of most commonly studied areas of IST, such as accounting information systems; database management and technologies; data warehousing and mining; decision support systems technologies; distance education technologies; e-collaboration; electronic commerce technologies management; end user computing; enterprise resource planning, expert systems; geographical information systems; global IT management; human computer interaction; human side of IT; information resources management; information security management; information systems research; information technology education; IT evaluation methods and management; IT management in libraries; IT management in health care; IT in small business; IT personnel; professional IT association; intelligent information systems; knowledge management; minorities in information technology; mobile computing and commerce; multimedia information management; objected oriented technologies; open source technologies and systems; social responsibility in the information age; software engineering; strategic IT management; telecommunications and networking technologies; unified modeling languages and unified process; and virtual communities and IT.

Perhaps the most challenging task related to the compilation of a dictionary for such a young field of science, is the fact that there is no single or standard definition in existence for each element of the vocabulary. Instead, individual researchers have formed distinctive descriptions of the terminology, providing a much more meaningful and broader understanding of each term. To achieve this goal, all attempts were made to supply the user of this dictionary with the most inclusive definition used to describe every term, and not just a singular definition designated by the editor. An exhibition of numerous language contributions from different researchers have been listed for each of the terms, allowing the user to be exposed to different angles of each definition in hopes that the user will form a much broader understanding of the vocabulary that is specific to IST.

This dictionary is divided into two sections. The first section lists all terms and acronyms in alphabetical order. Each term may consist of multiple definitions, numbered in sequential order, and ends with the source/reference from which the definition was derived. The second section includes the complete reference information, also organized in alphabetical order and formatted to comply with American Psychological Association (APA) recommended style guidelines. Although one might notice a wide range of definitions for various terms, it is our opinion that it is much more helpful to provide an expansive list of definitions rather than limit the meaning to a singular description. Furthermore, to defuse any inaccuracy in the definitions obtained from different sources, it was decided to provide the most complete meaning as possible, allowing for any confusion that may result from the descriptions to be dealt with in light of other explanations.

The two-volume Dictionary of Information Science and Technology is the premier comprehensive resource composed of the latest terms and definitions related to all aspects of the information science and technology field. This complete and timely reference collection of over 13,000 definitions for more than 11,000 terms and acronyms will provide researchers, practitioners, educators and students with the most accurate and current knowledge available of prevalent key words in the ever-expanding world of IST. Terms and definitions included in this important reference publication were contributed by over 2,500 noted researchers from over 40 countries. The Dictionary of Information Science and Technology will prove to be a valuable and essential reference publication for libraries and individuals worldwide.

To make sure that the Dictionary of Information Science and Technology and its coverage stays up-to-date, access to the dictionary’s online database, which provides complete search capabilities, will be offered to all libraries at a discount of 50% off the subscription price upon purchase of the print copy. This database will be updated on a regular basis with new terms, acronyms, and their definitions, and will provide coverage of all new and emerging terminologies and their definitions as they materialize.

The comprehensive coverage of thousands of terms and acronyms provided in this two-volume resource will contribute to a better understanding of the technical and managerial language available and its applications for the field of information science and technology. Furthermore, the definitions included in this dictionary will be instrumental in the body of knowledge expanding in this vast field. The coverage of this two-volume dictionary provides strength to this source of reference for both information science and technology researchers in obtaining a greater comprehension of the language of IST. It is my sincere hope that this reference publication and its immeasurable amount of valuable information will assist my research colleagues, all faculty, their students, and practitioners in enhancing their understanding of this discipline. Perhaps this publication will even inspire additional breakthroughs in this gigantic field and elevate it to a much higher level within the world of scientific discoveries.

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A.
Information Resources Management Association, USA

Reference

Khosrow-Pour, M., & Yaverbaum, G.J. (1990). Information technology resources utilization and management: Issues and trends. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing.

Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., received his Doctorate in Business Administration from the Nova Southeastern University (Florida, USA). Dr. Khosrow-Pour taught undergraduate and graduate information system courses at the Pennsylvania State University – Harrisburg for almost 20 years. He is currently Executive Editor at IGI Global (www.igi-global.com). He also serves as Executive Director of the Information Resources Management Association (IRMA) (www.irma-international.org) and Executive Director of the World Forgotten Children’s Foundation (www.world-forgotten-children.org). He is the author/editor of more than 100 books in information technology management. He is also currently the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Green Computing, International Journal of Library and Information Services, International Journal of E-Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and International Journal of Natural Computing Research, and is also the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Information Resources Management Journal, Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations, Journal of Cases on Information Technology, and the Journal of Information Technology Research, and has authored more than 50 articles published in various conference proceedings and scholarly journals.

Indices