Climate Change: Inclusion of Gender and Cultural Diversity in Climate Change Actions

Climate Change: Inclusion of Gender and Cultural Diversity in Climate Change Actions

Mgbeodichinma Eucharia Onuoha Oragwa (Technical University of Mining Bergakadmie Freiberg, Germany)
Copyright: © 2021 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-3479-3.ch095

Abstract

Climate change caused by the anthropogenic accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the air is affecting all life on earth and bearing upon human undertakings thereby representing the most complicated challenge of our time. Across cultures, the impacts of climate change affect women and men differently. Although women being disproportionately impacted by climate change, they play a key role in adapting and mitigating climate change. This is why UN-Climate Change negotiations have incorporated gender action plans to guarantee equal room and resources for women and men for decision-making and action on climate change at all levels. For instance, a gender-sensitive approach to climate finance is increasingly being used to better tackle future gender inequalities as seen in the green climate fund scenario. The purpose of this paper is to encourage awareness of importance of gender and cultural diversity inclusion in climate change actions.
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Introduction

Climate change has influenced horticulture fundamentally, especially diminishments in soil water accessibility, impacts of hoisted CO2 movements of warm and dampness limits to cropping, effect on drought, warm anxiety and different extremes, impacts on nuisances, weeds and ailments, and effects on soil fruitfulness. The question is no longer how much global warming and climate change rather what are the impacts and what ought to be done about it? To the later, the only way is by choosing to act with a sense of urgency starting from encouraging awareness of importance of gender and cultural diversity inclusion in climate actions, to energy policy reform down to mitigation and Adaptation measures (OECD/IEA, 2001).

However, Martin-Luther king’s words four decade back still hold an intense reverberation in this twenty-first century where we are still faced with the savage urgency of a crisis that connects today and tomorrow; that is climate change crisis (UNDP, 2007/2008). Climate change is the characterizing human advancement issue of our age. All development is eventually about growing human potential and extending human freedom. It is about individuals building up the abilities that engage them to settle on decisions and to lead experience that they esteem. Climate change debilitates to dissolve human freedoms and limit choice. It raises doubt about the principle rule that human advance will make the future look better than the past (UNDP, 2007/2008). Moreover, since the peak of public mindfulness in the mid-1990s the global environmental issue known as climate change has been developing and changing quickly as of late (Sanderson et al., 2007). One of the most important factors, has been the inclusion of gender and cultural diversity in climate actions which in the past was either disregarded or given as an after-thought in the overall environmental change debate, while now it has become a more important hypothetical and policy issues (UNDP, 2011).

As climate is changing, culture is changing also (Wisner B., 2010). Across cultures, the effects of environmental change influenced women and men differently. Although women are excessively affectd by environmental change, they assume a key role in adapting and mitigating climate change (UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub, 2019). For example, in the developing nations, women typically have the responsibility of gathering and generating food, collecting water and sourcing fuel for heating and cooking but with environmental change extrem events, these duties become harder to some women in the globe. Due to the above mentioned activities of some of these women in the globe, they are exposed with the knowledge and understanding of what is required to adapt to altering environmental circumstances and discovering pratical solutions (UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub, 2019). Culture according to van den pol is generally defined as a total of meanings and knowledge that human beings required to operate in a certain situation, for example, understanding of language, practices, rituals, views, values & norms etc. (Van den Pol, 2010).

Cultural diversity and climate change are two inseparable situations in the sense that, due to global warming: horticulture decreases and the generation of environmental refugees increases as a result of search for food and greener pastures, disruption of cultural continuity due to enhanced mortality from infectious diseases, mental dysfunction, stunted child development from malnutrition and the disruption of family life (Hoff, 2002). Knowing the importance of gender and cultural diversity, this article tends to promote more awareness to the importance of its inclusion on climate actions. Also note, that environmental change and climate change will be used in this paper as a synonym; the word ‘Inclusion’ also refers to ‘consideration’ in this paper.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Values: Which is defined as interests, pleasure, likes, preferences, moral obligations, desires, wants, goals, needs, aversions, and attractions, which play a significant role on how people respond to climate change action like mitigation and adaptation.

Climate Finance: Is the exchange of funds from developed nations to the developing nations to empower them to adapt to the unavoidable effect of climate change by reducing GHG and embarking on clean energy advancement ways.

Gender Mainstreaming: Here simply refers to thinking differently, adjusting environmental and development mediations so that they will profit men and women evenly, and changing social, economic and institutional structures towards gender fairness and women’s empowerment in environmental activity and resilience building.

Climate Change: Alludes to any change in climate over time, whether due to regular inconstancy or on account of human activity.

Green Climate Fund: Is a type of climate change finance established with the goal to mobilize climate fund to help scale-up mitigation and adaption action in developing nations on equal measure.

Culture: According to van den pol is generally defined as a total of meanings and knowledge that human beings required to operate in a certain situation, for example, understanding of language, practices, rituals, views, values and norms, etc.

Diversity: Is broadly defined to incorporate contracts in race, gender, national inception, ethnicity, capacity, and even geographical root.

Gender: In the context of climate change is described as socially constructed norms, roles, and relations that a given society considers appropriate for men and women.

Gender Inclusion: Simply means as indicated by UN women, utilizing co-benefits among gender correspondence and climate activity which requires a change in perspective that puts gender interests and the voice and organization of women and girls, and men and boys, at the focal point of environmental management endeavors and ventures.

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