Developing Project Management Maturity as an Organizational Change Process

Developing Project Management Maturity as an Organizational Change Process

Gilbert Silvius (LOI University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands & University of Johannesburg, South Africa)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-3197-5.ch015

Abstract

The entanglement of project management and the management of organizational change is not reflected in the literature on and standards of project management maturity. Studies on maturity concentrate on identifying the components that determine an organization's maturity, the levels in which this maturity can be expressed, and the effects of maturity. However, the process of changing from one level to another level is hardly or not addressed. By taking an organizational change perspective on developing maturity, this chapter develops a framework that provides guidance for the development of maturity. For every transition, from one level to another, a set of interventions is provided that addresses both the hard and the soft dimensions of organizational change. Successful project management maturity development requires that equal attention is being paid to both the hard and the soft dimensions of organizational change. The framework developed in this chapter provide guidance for this.
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A Contingency Approach To Organizational Change

While there appears to be consensus about that organizations are subject to frequent, and perhaps even continuous, change, the management of these changes remains an area of debate. Traditional models of organizational change depict organizational change as a linear and planned process. An example of such a model is Lewin’s well-known model that depicts the change process as three-stages (Lewin, 1947):

  • Unfreezing: Ensuring that employees are ready for change;

  • Change: Executing the intended change;

  • Re-Freezing: Ensuring that the change becomes permanent.

Also Kotter (1995), in his article on change management, suggests that change develops in a series of phases and that it requires a considerable length of time (Kotter, 1995). This series of phases can be summarized as:

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