Influence of Job Relevance, Output Quality, Task Technology Fit, and Privacy Concerns on Human Resources Information Systems Usage

Influence of Job Relevance, Output Quality, Task Technology Fit, and Privacy Concerns on Human Resources Information Systems Usage

Eric Deakins (University of Waikato, New Zealand)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-883-3.ch077
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Abstract

Since the late 1990s, human resources information systems (HRIS) that exploit inexpensive browser technology have been implemented by companies and public sector organizations alike due to the perceived benefits of such self-service systems, which include: added convenience for employees, simplified approval processes, reduced administration costs, and more time for strategic human resources management (HRM) activities (e.g., Zampetti and Adamson, 2001). Yet despite their growing pervasiveness, it is common that the e-HRM is underused by employees in many organizations (Gevity, 2005). The purpose of this article is to offer insights that will help system developers and human resources managers to design and introduce user-accepted e-HRM systems. The remainder of this article is organized as follows: Following a review of information technology usage behavior, an augmented technology acceptance model suitable for studying e-HRM use is proposed. An empirical study of e-HRM user behavior is then presented and the findings discussed. The article concludes with future trends, implications for academics and practitioners, and study limitations.
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Background

Given the generally low level of e-HRM acceptance by employees, there is a need to identify and confirm the factors that influence user intention to use e-HRM (Hong, Thong, Wong, & Tam, 2001-2002; Ruël, Bondarouk, & Van der Velde, 2007). Similar investigations of other information systems have, to-date, predominantly involved a choice of two main approaches.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Perceived usefulness: The degree to which a person believes that the e-HRM system will enhance his or her job performance.

Behavioral Intention: An individual’s intention to use a system with intention to use serving as a mediator of actual system use.

Attitude: The user’s evaluation of their desirability of using the e-HRM system.

Perceived ease of use: The degree to which a person believes that using the e-HRM system will be free of effort.

Computer Self-Efficacy: Reflects a person’s perception of his or her ability to carry out a specific task based on past performance or experience, and also the confidence of what could be achieved in the future.

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