Interaction Model in Groupware Use for Knowledge Management

Interaction Model in Groupware Use for Knowledge Management

Jessada Panyasorn (University of Bath, UK), Niki Panteli (University of Bath, UK) and Philip Powell (University of Bath, UK)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 7
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-000-4.ch061
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Abstract

This article focuses on the use of Lotus Notes, a well-known groupware application studied in the literature for cooperation, because its features cover the broad definition of groupware as technologies providing “electronic networks that support communication, coordination and collaboration through facilities such as information exchange, shared repositories, discussion forums and messaging” (Orlikowski & Hofman, 1997, p. 12). It advances the debate on the potentials of groupware in knowledge management. It posits that although Lotus Notes has been the focus of existing research, a paucity of studies has examined its functionality in relation to knowledge management. Therefore, the authors aim to illustrate the use of Notes for cooperation, which leads to organizational knowledge management.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Groupware: Technology that provides electronic networks that support communication, coordination, and collaboration through facilities such as information exchange, shared repositories, discussion forums, and messaging.

Lotus Notes (Notes): One of the most well-known groupware products in the market by IBM, it allows information to be distributed between different users, using the shared databases integrated with e-mail.

Knowledge Management: A strategy for managing knowledge that includes people, processes, and technology for creating, capturing, categorizing, disseminating, and using knowledge to generate value to the organization.

Interaction: Defined as a process by which two or more things have an effect on each other and work together.

Information: A flow of messages, results from placing data within some meaningful content.

Knowledge: Knowledge is what is believed and valued on the basis of the meaningfully organized accumulation of information (messages) through experience, communication, or inference. Individuals use their knowledge to perform actions such as creating information for other individuals, while knowledge is created in practice, in the activities of and interactions between individuals.

Interaction Richness Model: Defined in this study as the extent to which depth of interaction leads to the exchange of information or knowledge.

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