Reconsidering a System for Measuring Dynamic Knowledge: Extending a Novel Line of Research

Reconsidering a System for Measuring Dynamic Knowledge: Extending a Novel Line of Research

Mark E. Nissen (US Naval Postgraduate School, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-2189-2.ch003

Abstract

It is axiomatic to say that knowledge is key to competitive advantage, but it is inherently invisible, intangible, and resistant to quantification, particularly when in dynamic motion. Recent research builds upon emerging knowledge measurement techniques and well-established knowledge flow theory to develop a system for measuring dynamic knowledge in the organization. Results from application to archetypical organization processes are encouraging and highly consistent with extant theory. The research described in this chapter summarizes three notable extensions to such work. It makes a theoretic contribution by extending a coherent approach to dynamic knowledge measurement, and it makes a practical contribution through illustration in the organization context. A related goal is to stimulate considerable thinking, discussion, debate, and continued research.
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Background

After casting a wide metaphoric net in terms of relevant literatures to review (e.g., Economics, Education, Information Theory, Knowledge Management) for background, insight and inspiration, the research noted above draws judiciously and analogically from deep understanding of dynamic physical systems to conceptualize a set of equations for measuring dynamic knowledge.

Analogic reasoning is a fundamental cognitive process (Phye, 1997), employed by adults (Sternberg, 1977) and children (Sternberg & Rifkin, 1979) alike. It represents a notably powerful learning and communication approach that spans many domains, including Design (Casakin, 2010), Organization (Tsoukas, 1993), Physics (Podolefsky & Finkelstein, 2007), Strategy (Gavetti & Rivkin, 2005), Supply Chain (Naim, Spiegler, Wikner & Towill, 2017), and many others. Analogies can promote creativity, in both people and computers (Kolodner, 1994), and they can facilitate thinking in domains with negligible precedent, such as Outer Space Law (Peterson, 2007).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Information Systems: A research field concerned with people in an organization setting, who use computer and network technologies to collect, process, analyze, distribute and store knowledge, information, and data.

Dynamics: The branch of Physics concerned with motion caused by forces.

Knowledge: That which enables action by intelligent people and machines.

Measurement: The process of associating numbers with physical or socio-technical processes and phenomena.

Visualization: The representation of objects, situations, relationships, equations, processes, phenomena or information via charts, graphs, images, or like means.

Systems of Equations: Sets of interrelated mathematic equations that characterize the structure and behavior of physical or socio-technical processes and phenomena.

Knowledge Management: The process of leveraging intellectual capital for competitive advantage in an organization setting.

Analogic Reasoning: A fundamental cognitive process, representing a notably powerful learning and communication approach that spans many domains, that can promote creativity, and that can facilitate thinking in domains with negligible precedent.

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