Strategies to Promote Pedagogical Knowledge Interplay with Technology

Strategies to Promote Pedagogical Knowledge Interplay with Technology

Prince Hycy Bull (North Carolina Central University, USA) and Gerrelyn C. Patterson (North Carolina Central University, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1803-7.ch003
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Abstract

The transformation from face-to-face instruction to digital instruction or hybrid learning requires robust pedagogical strategies. This chapter addresses key pedagogical strategies used to support online learning experiences through the lenses of evidence-based educational theories. Additionally, the TPACK framework, which asserts that instruction requires the interplay of technological knowledge, content knowledge, and pedagogical knowledge, is used to analyze students' perceptions of flipped and double flipped online courses. The data show positive dispositions of flipping and double flipping the classroom as pedagogical strategies. Flipped content provided powerful instruction and provided participants with opportunities to utilize learned multimedia skills and receive constructive feedback from the instructor and peers. Double flipping promoted more classroom engagement, interactivity, and class discussions. In both flipped and double flipped classrooms, there was a shift from an instructor-driven learning environment to a whole-class driven learning environment.
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Introduction

With technology driving 21st century education, the infusion of appropriate pedagogical strategies supported by research-based theories will enhance digital delivery, promote positive learning outcomes, promote self-reflection and self-assessment, engage all learners in the process, and provide powerful learning experiences. Courses with online learning, fully online or hybrid/blended tend to produce stronger student learning outcomes than completely face-to-face instruction (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). The shift from face-to-face instruction to digital instruction or hybrid learning requires sound pedagogical strategies. Digital instruction includes didactic lectures or interactive text delivered over the web, internet-based collaboration, role-playing, simulations, and problem-solving instructional games. Digital instruction is designed mainly as a replacement for face-to-face instruction through virtual courses or as an enhancement for a face-to-face learning experience through hybrid or blended delivery. Pedagogical experiences determine who delivers the instruction or what controls how learners experience and acquire knowledge. These pedagogical experiences are classified into three major categories: expository learning or instruction, active learning, and interactive learning. Expository instruction deals with how digital devices are used to transmit knowledge. Active learning deals with how the learner builds knowledge through manipulation and interaction with digital resources. Interactive learning deals with how the learner builds knowledge through inquiry-based collaborative learning with instructors and peers.

This chapter addresses key pedagogical strategies and resources used to support learning experiences, digital instruction, synchronous, asynchronous, and hybrid learning. These pedagogical strategies are addressed through the lenses of evidence-based educational theories: the constructivist approach; technological knowledge, content knowledge, and pedagogical knowledge frameworks; self-efficacy theory; multiple intelligences theory; Bloom’s taxonomy revised; the Universal Design for Learning principle; and flipping and double-flipping of the classroom frameworks.

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