Technology Tools for Integration in the Classroom

Technology Tools for Integration in the Classroom

Dean Anthony Olah (University of Guam, Guam)
Copyright: © 2019 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7438-5.ch007

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to help educators learn about tools, techniques, and resources that can help them use technologies to increase engagement and enhance learning outcomes for their students. The chapter will introduce free and low-cost programs and resources available on the internet and app stores for teachers as part of the instructional and administrative process. Instructional technologies have the inherent potential to assist educators in addressing the challenges in this modern-day world. Many of the resources and tools can be accessed through most connected devices and web browsers.
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Introduction

This chapter introduces free and low-cost programs and resources available on the Internet and App Stores for teachers as part of the instructional process. Instructional technology has the inherent potential to assist teachers in addressing the challenges in this modern-day world. Numerous resources and tools can be accessed through most connected devices and Web browsers. Instructional technology refers to the development and application of technological tools and devices such as software, processes, and hardware, which are geared towards ethical practice and study in the field of education with an aim to achieve, facilitate, and promote student learning (Ajay Kumar & Umadevi, 2015). Due to the necessity of education today, there is a need to improve students’ learning capacity by obtaining less expensive educational resources. Instructional technology plays a crucial role in accomplishing this vital mission of providing a broader range of student learning modalities and the achievement of teaching excellence.

The chapter explains various techniques and resources that are responsible for enhancing education outcomes. The technology resources presented here are categorized into the following eight sections:

  • 1.

    Blogs

  • 2.

    Course Management Tools

  • 3.

    Educational Games

  • 4.

    Social Media

  • 5.

    Student Response Systems

  • 6.

    Videos and Screencasting for Flipping Classrooms

  • 7.

    Classroom Management and Assessment Tools

  • 8.

    Additional Technology Resources

Key Terms in this Chapter

Student Response System (SRS): Interactive digital devices that allow instructors to pose questions to students and gather their responses during class. Some student response systems are commonly referred to as clickers, classroom response systems, personal response systems, or audience response systems.

Gamification: Using game design and mechanics to drive motivation and increase engagement in learning.

Blog: Computer scientists first used blogs to keep track and share hyperlinks. It was an early form of bookmarking websites. Later, Jorn Barger was credited for first using the term “Web logs” in 1997, which was shortened to “blogs” in 1999 by Peter Merholz. Blogs quickly evolved to online diaries and later to news outlets.

Instructional Technology: The development and application of technological tools and devices such as the software, processes, and hardware, which are geared towards the ethical practice and study in the field of education with an aim to achieve, facilitate, and promote learning and performance.

Instructional Blogging: The term instructional blogging (IB) is used here to refer to blogs that are used as class assignments to promote student learning.

Learning Management System (LMS): This is an online learning environment that allows teachers to communicate with students and to assess their work. There are many LMS’s available. The most common for secondary and post-secondary schools are Moodle, Blackboard, Canvas, Brightspace, and eCollege.

Blended Learning Environment: This is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online learning, with some elements of student control over time, place, path, or pace; and at least in part in a supervised brick-and-mortar location away from home.

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