Using Video Capture and Annotation Technology to Strengthen Reflective Practices and Feedback in Educator Preparation

Using Video Capture and Annotation Technology to Strengthen Reflective Practices and Feedback in Educator Preparation

Christina M. Tschida (East Carolina University, USA), Jennifer L. Gallagher (East Carolina University, USA), Kimberly L. Anderson (East Carolina University, USA), Caitlin L. Ryan (East Carolina University, USA), Joy N. Stapleton (Winthrop University, USA) and Karen D. Jones (East Carolina University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-8009-6.ch015

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors share the history of a video capture and annotation technology (VCAT) implementation and provide summaries of research findings to support its continued use and refinement. They also detail the multiple uses and particular objectives they aimed to meet with the technology across different content areas and even across multiple educator preparation programs, including a collaboration between a teacher education program and principal preparation program that was enabled by the technology.
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Video Capture And Annotation Technology

The use of video in educator preparation has been around for many decades. Since the 1960s teacher educators have made use of video when engaging teacher candidates in microteaching activities and guiding peer reflection and feedback (Rich & Hannafin, 2009). Early on, the focus was often on identifying and developing distinct teaching skills that had been correlated to gains in student achievement (Copeland, 1982; Grossman, 2005). In the final decade of the twentieth century the focus shifted to using video to examine teacher thinking and decision making, and video was often used to provide cases for such reflection (Lambdin, Duffy, & Moore, 1997; Trier, 2003). Moving into the 2000s saw a shift to using video capture technology to record teacher candidates in the classroom and provide opportunities to reflect on their teaching; however, until recently, such technology has been extensively, and almost exclusively, used by educational researchers rather than applied in educator preparation programs to scaffold and support the development of teacher reflection (Rich & Hannafin, 2009).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Supervised Practicum: An organized experience within a school classroom that allows teacher candidates to practice and demonstrate their developing teaching skills and competencies through the completion of specific requirements. Teacher candidates are accompanied to the school by a university instructor who facilitates the practicum, observes teaching, and verifies completion of the practicum.

Video Supported Reflection: A reflective practice technique in which video recordings, rather than one’s own memory, is used as a basis for the reflection and professional growth.

Video Annotation: A note of explanation, reflection, comment, or feedback added to a video recording, often including time-coding to facilitate ease of navigating to the specific place in the video.

Reflective Practice: Purposeful examination of one’s actions and teaching experiences in the classroom as a means of professional development and self-improvement.

Unsupervised Practicum: An organized experience within a school classroom that allows teacher candidates to practice and demonstrate their developing teaching skills and competencies through the completion of specific requirements. No university instructor is present at the site and teacher candidates are responsible for securing proof of completion of tasks and practicum hours.

Online Video Platform: Enables users to upload, convert, story, and play back video on the internet through a structured system provided by a video hosting service.

Instructional Coaching: Providing non-evaluative, supportive instruction feedback to teacher candidates and facilitating their reflection through questions, comments, and dialogue.

Instructional Feedback: Information about how well one is doing in one’s efforts to reach a goal for perform a specific task related to their teaching.

Coach: A facilitator of someone else’s learning to help them improve their practice.

Video Capture: The process of capturing digital video from a variety of media sources (such as a camera, laptop, or smartphone) for local storage or sending it to an external online platform.

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