Kevin Warwick

Kevin WarwickKevin Warwick is Emeritus Professor at Reading and Coventry Universities. His main research areas are artificial intelligence, biomedical systems and cyborgs. His research as a self-experimenter means he is frequently called the world’s first Cyborg. Kevin took his first degree at Aston University, followed by a PhD at Imperial College London. He held positions at Oxford, Newcastle, Warwick, Reading and Coventry Universities. His experiments into implant technology led to him being featured as the cover story on the US magazine, ‘Wired’. He achieved the world’s first direct electronic communication between two human nervous systems, the basis for thought communication.

Publications

What Is It Like to Be a Cyborg?
Kevin Warwick. © 2021. 11 pages.
In this chapter, the author describes his personal experience in experimenting as a cyborg (part biology/part technology) by having technology implanted in his body, which he...
Trust and Decision Making in Turing's Imitation Game
Huma Shah, Kevin Warwick. © 2019. 16 pages.
Trust is an expected certainty in order to transact confidently. However, how accurate is our decision-making in human-machine interaction? In this chapter, the present evidence...
Trust and Decision Making in Turing's Imitation Game
Huma Shah, Kevin Warwick. © 2018. 14 pages.
Trust is an expected certainty in order to transact confidently. However, how accurate is our decision-making in human-machine interaction? In this chapter we present evidence...
What Is It Like to Be a Cyborg?
Kevin Warwick. © 2018. 11 pages.
In this chapter, the author describes his personal experience in experimenting as a cyborg (part biology/part technology) by having technology implanted in his body, which he...
International Journal of Ethics in Digital Research and Scholarship (IJEDRS)
Jeffrey Hsu. Est. 2017.
The International Journal of Ethics in Digital Research and Scholarship (IJEDRS) provides state-of-the-art research on the impact, application, theoretical issues and...
Practical Experimentation with Human Implants
Kevin Warwick, Mark N. Gasson. © 2014. 69 pages.
In this chapter, the authors report on several different types of human implants with which the authors have direct, first hand, experience. An indication is given of the...
The Turing Test: A New Appraisal
Kevin Warwick, Huma Shah. © 2014. 15 pages.
This paper appraises some of the prevailing ideas surrounding one of Turing's brilliant ideas, his imitation game experiment, and considers judge performance in assessing...
Outwitted by the Hidden: Unsure Emotions
Kevin Warwick, Huma Shah. © 2014. 14 pages.
In this paper the authors consider natural, feigned or absence of emotions in text-based dialogues. The dialogues occurred during interactions between human Judges/Interrogators...
International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education (IJCEE)
Jeffrey Hsu. Est. 2011.
The International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education (IJCEE) provides state-of-the-art research on the impact and general principles of ethical computer use in academics, while...
What Is It Like to Be a Robot?
Kevin Warwick. © 2010. 16 pages.
It is now possible to grow a biological brain within a robot body. As an outsider it is exciting to consider what the brain is thinking about, when it is interacting with the...
Emotion in the Turing Test: A Downward Trend for Machines in Recent Loebner Prizes
Huma Shah, Kevin Warwick. © 2009. 25 pages.
The Turing Test, originally configured as a game for a human to distinguish between an unseen and unheard man and woman, through a text-based conversational measure of gender, is...
Technoethics: An Anthropological Approach
Daniela Cerqui, Kevin Warwick. © 2009. 12 pages.
Common ethical issues related to technology are formulated in terms of impact. With an anthropological approach, every technological device is considered as the result of a...
Prospects for Thought Communication: Brain to Machine and Brain to Brain
Kevin Warwick, Daniela Cerqui. © 2008. 18 pages.
In this chapter, we take a look at the realistic future possibility of thought communication— brain to machine and brain to brain. Technical details are presented on...