Socio-Technical and Human Cognition Elements of Information Systems

Socio-Technical and Human Cognition Elements of Information Systems

Steve Clarke (University of Hull Business School, UK), Elayne Coakes (University of Westminster, UK), M. Gordon Hunter (University of Lethbridge, Canada) and Andrew Wenn (Victoria University, Australia)
Release Date: July, 2002|Copyright: © 2003 |Pages: 306|DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-104-9
ISBN13: 9781591401049|ISBN10: 1591401046|EISBN13: 9781591401124
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Description

Information resource management is too often seen as a domain dominated by technology, or, at best, one in which human considerations are secondary to and dependent on technological systems. Socio-Technical and Human Cognition Elements of Information Systems brings together chapters from Europe, Australasia, Canada and the Americas, all drawn together by the common theme of the book. It will present information management not as technology influenced by people, but as fundamentally a people-centred domain.

Reviews and Testimonials

If you are interested in the genuine success of your business improvement projects, then start reading here. We are forcefully reminded that the software engineering is the easy part but that getting the human factors right is the tough part. Here we learn that the greatest complexity and subtly resides, not in the technical system but, in the social system that will employ it and the interactions between the two. - Stephen Murgatroyd, Ergonomics Society; British Computer Society - HCI SIG This book is a great reference and learning tool. Key aspects of information technology use and management (systems analysis, design and pertinent methodologies) are identified. Several case studies, eclectic in nature, provide additional insight to the various topics outlined. Important contributors to pertinent research are cited: among them Edith Mumford, P. K. Checkland, R. Hirsheim, B. Scheiderman, H. Simon, R. Ackoff, D. Avison, K. Lyytinen, E. Yourdon, J. Marton, R. Zmud. The importance of information systems user and the user's role in the information environment are highlighted. The role and importance of human factors in system design efforts are clearly defined. A variety of existing as well as new theories concerning different aspects of information systems are described. The researcher and student are provided insight and the opportunity to pursue and address a number of issues.

– Daniel Radell, Independent consultant; member AIS

E.W. Dijkstra, one of the founders of computing science, noted a long time ago that when computers first appeared the goal of our programs was to instruct our machines, but now the goal of our machines should be to execute our programs. Similarly, the goal of IT systems should be to satisfy well-defined business needs instead of -- as it often still happens -- directing businesses in their operational, tactical, or strategic work. When IT provides opportunities as a business enabler, the business (including social) and IT aspects of an organization are intertwined and thus have to be specified and reasoned about explicitly. In all cases, reasoning about IT systems (which never exist in isolation) and their organizational contexts should be done using concepts and terms understandable to all stakeholders, from business decision makers to IT developers. This interesting book shows various approaches of doing just that.

– Haim Kilov, Chief Architect, Business Modeling, Financial Systems Architects

This book bundles up a wide range of perspectives on the social and individual contexts within which computer-based systems are developed and used. The reader will get insights into the thinking that went into the further refinement of Multiview. Fresh ideas are generated concerning privacy, conflict, politics and technology-push or user-pull. Most of this work is grounded in interesting case studies. As an extra treat, Habermas, Foucault and Latour are also unpackaged and used to illuminate the world of IS development.

– Philip Carter, PhD, Director, Usability Lab, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

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Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

Steve Clarke, Ph.D.received a BSc in Economics from The University of Kingston Upon Hull, an MBA from the University of Luton, and a PhD in human centred approaches to information systems development from Brunel University (UK). He is a professor of Information Systems in the University of Hull Business School (UK). He has extensive experience in management systems and information systems consultancy and research, focusing primarily on the identification and satisfaction of user needs and issues connected with knowledge management. His research interests include: social theory and information systems practice; strategic planning; and the impact of user involvement in the development of management systems. Professor Clarke is the co-editor of two books, Socio-Technical and Human Cognition Elements of Information Systems, 2003 published by Idea Group Publishing, and Beyond Knowledge Management, 2004 published by Idea Group Publishing.
Elayne Coakes is a senior lecturer in business information management. She has a BA (Pub Admin) from Sheffield Polytechnic, a MSc (information systems), and a PhD (information systems) from Brunel University. Her current research relates to knowledge sharing in organizations. She is an internationally acknowledged expert on sociotechnical thinking and knowledge management. She was a visiting professor in Seville University (Spain), under the government grant scheme for distinguished, international scholars, a visiting research fellow in Queens University (Canada), and a keynote speaker at Manchester University (UK) at the Tribute day for Enid Mumford. As the Vice-Chair of the BCS Sociotechnical Special Group she is active in promoting information systems and has edited three books of international contributions in this field. Since then she has co-authored Beyond Knowledge Management and the Encyclopedia of Communities of Practice in Information and Knowledge Management. Additionally, she has published more than sixty book chapters, peer reviewed journal articles, and conference papers.
M. Gordon Hunter is Professor of Information Systems in the Faculty of Management at The University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Gordon has previously held academic positions at universities in Canada, Singapore, and Hong Kong. He has held visiting positions at universities in Australia, Monaco, Germany, New Zealand, and the U.S. During July and August of 2005 Gordon was a Visiting Erskine Fellow at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Andrew Wenn is a lecturer in the School of Information Systems at Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne.