Consumers as Producers: Information Decomposition Exploiting the Prosumerist culture

Consumers as Producers: Information Decomposition Exploiting the Prosumerist culture

Sandeep Kaur (Bharathiar University, India)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8598-7.ch003
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Abstract

The present study investigates the decomposition caused by an information catastrophe in the electronic era where an array of information has become extremely easier and cheaper to construct, maneuver and systematize through a qualitative theoretical underpinning from distinguished theoreticians in the field. Quoting a few user generated sites such as the Wikipedia (Online Encyclopedia) that anyone can edit, this chapter highlights critical apprehension over the generation of over-abundant content by unidentified multiple sources over this open sharing model. Recommendations and suggestions on effectual inquiry of published content over user generated sites for scholars around the world to rely on shape the finishing fraction of this chapter.
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Introduction

Communication is equivocal. We are limited by a language where words may mean one thing to one person and quite something else to another. There is no ordained right way to communicate. At least in the absolute sense, it is impossible to share our thoughts with someone else, for they will not be understood in exactly the same way (Wurman, 1989).

Emergence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have demonstrated manifold ways to revolutionalize the way information is fabricated in this digital era in terms of its production, dispensation in addition to its manipulation, thus, unparalleling the human brain to accommodate the same. This results in a rapid amplification of the information processing skill of an individual to compete with his/her cognitive chattels inquiring the appropriate filtering of the plentiful information to accelerate access to germane content. These technologies have fashioned an information catastrophe that necessitate a measure of control to govern the ecology of information. As Klapp (1986) has fittingly avowed that the quality of information is judged not by its precision and clarity alone, but how it acts upon receivers. Contrarily, these elements may not turn out to be a trouble-free task in the digisphere as communication becomes ineffective when the content generates an absolute loss of its meaning. In the perspective of the escalating accretion of information in the digital epoch, the momentous rationale behind this meaning lag can be associated with the ‘facts’ that mount up and surpass its subsistence (Klapp, 1982).

Decomposition’ has become branded as an imperative process in the digital ecosystem involving a succession of diverse knowledge workers; one set taking over after the last one has consumed what he/she can, and in doing so, extending the control of information seeking behaviour. Rapid explosion of happenings around the world unparallel one’s cognitive ability to process and coalesce rightful information. Klapp (1986) expected that before settling large questions, we go on to new ones, dissatisfied with what we know, no wiser than before. In the meanwhile, information floods on, demanding that something be done (as cited in Walter, 1989, p.6).

Information becomes decomposed when it becomes irrelevant for the consumer. Burgeoning social media and user generated content authorize anyone and everyone to be a fabricator of its content without effectual governance. This decay in the constructive information crops up when multifarious sources are given autonomy to amend a specific section of sector-specific information resulting in the loss of inimitable content personalized for the user needs.

Figure 1.

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Thus, the information society is on the threshold of becoming an insignificant society if this situation persists. In consequence, decomposition takes the form of a cognitive process in which an individual’s information processing skills corrodes or disintegrates when two or more individuals under similar state of affairs happen to be the architects of the same content as they encounter the information offered to them, thus giving rise to a complex media environment where the meaningful content relapses.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Prosumer: Participation of customers in the production process of content of information.

Information Glut: High-speed gargantuan information directed at none in particular.

Information Anxiety: A product reflecting too much information as too little information.

Digital Natives: Segment of the audience who are immersed in a digitally networked environment.

Gatekeepers: People responsible to guarantee the reception of information among the audience based on certain levels of quality.

Decomposition: A cognitive process in which an individual’s information processing skills corrodes or disintegrates when two or more individuals under similar state of affairs happen to be the architects of the same content as they encounter the information offered to them, thus giving rise to a complex media environment where the meaningful content relapses.

User Generated Content (UGC): Publicly accessible content over the Internet that mirror a certain amount of artistic endeavor to be fashioned outside of customary proficient practices.

Information Society: An economical reserve that satisfies the general demand for information facilities and services in public.

Information: Values within the outcome of any process.

Meaning Lag: A point where availability of too much information distorts the exact meaning of the content under debate.

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