Social User Experience for Effective Mobile Advertising

Social User Experience for Effective Mobile Advertising

Stavros Asimakopoulos (Lancaster University Management School, UK), Frank Spillers (Experience Dynamics, USA), George Boretos (Global Forecasting Solutions, UK) and Zhengjie Liu (Dalian Maritime University, China)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5888-2.ch134
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Background

Mobile is the fastest growing segment on the online advertising market creating opportunities for life-enriching UX and value within this emerging marketplace (Chen & Hsieh, 2011). Mobile advertising is described as a form of advertising that is communicated to the consumer/target via a handset. This type of advertising is most commonly seen as a Mobile Web Banner (top of page), Mobile Web Poster (bottom of page), and full screen interstitial, which appears while a requested mobile web page is “loading’ (Mobile Marketing Association, 2008), primarily in smartphones as well as Tablets. As mobile technology applications continue to increase, so do the number of mobile subscribers. With a penetration of 84 percent of mobile subscribers in the United States, with this percentage surging to 100 percent by 2013 (Kagan, 2007) and the latest figures from Nielsen (2012) showing that between July 2011 and July 2012 smartphone penetration in the US jumped from 41% to 55% (and global smartphone penetration range from 10% to 15%), the mobile phone and network is promptly becoming a feasible marketing channel for marketers and advertisers. For users, this in practice means the provision of targeted, context-accurate, relevant and non-intrusive messages, which carefully manage the exposure of personal data towards the advertising industry. One of the greatest barriers to online mobile advertising is user resistance: at best, users perceive it as irrelevant and distractive and at worst they find it intrusive and an invasion of their privacy (Emarketer, 2011; Leontiadis et al., 2012). UX thus inevitably becomes a major issue that may contribute to make the mobile advertising experience so relevant, rewarding and entertaining where users will not just accept it but embrace it. Moreover, Emarketer reported (2011) on a new survey (by Yahoo and the Nielsen Company) that social media (43%) and mobile users (63%) hate ads the most. In addition, mobile ads are 50% more likely to cause users negative feelings than website ads.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Human Aspects of Business: Focus to improve the human-computer interactions in a business environment.

Sociability and User Experience: The extent to which a computer-supported interactive environment is able to facilitate social interactions, and in turn, leads to wider group and user benefits.

Social Technologies and Human Computer Interaction: Any technology that facilitates social interactions and is enabled by a communications capability, such as the Internet or a mobile device. Examples are social software (e.g., wikis, blogs, social networks) and communication capabilities (e.g., Web conferencing) that are targeted at and enable social interactions.

Mobile Computing: The display, collection, and transfer of information from a mobile device to an information system using one or a combination of various data transfer methods.

User Adoption: Effective use of an interactive system by its users to the full advantage of the business.

Mobile advertising: A form of advertising that is communicated to the consumer/target via a handset. This type of advertising is most commonly seen as a Mobile Web Banner, Mobile Web Poster, and full screen interstitial, which appears while a requested mobile web page is ‘loading’.

User-Centered Computing: Knowledge of human users and the social context in which systems are expected to operate become integrated into the computer science agenda, even at the earliest stages of research, design and development.

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