Journal Contents: International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL)

View the International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL) home page for complete details.
Volume 7 (2017)
Issue 1
Article 1
Virtual Games and Real-World Communities: Environments that Constrain and Enable Physical Activity in Games for Health (pages 1-19)
Mary K. Stewart (Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, United States), Danielle Hagood (University of California, Davis, CA, United States), Cynthia Carter Ching (University of California, Davis, CA, United States)
Article 2
Supporting Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning Through Kinect-Based Gaming (pages 20-35)
Mehmet Fatih Urun (Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey), Hasan Aksoy (Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey), Rasim Comez (Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey)
Article 3
A Computer-Based Game that Promotes Mathematics Learning More than a Conventional Approach (pages 36-56)
Bruce M. McLaren (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA), Deanne M. Adams (University of Notre Dame, USA), Richard E. Mayer (University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA), Jodi Forlizzi (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA)
Article 4
Integrating Music into Math in a Virtual Reality Game: Learning Fractions (pages 57-73)
Taehyeong Lim (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA), Sungwoong Lee (Emporia State University, Emporia, KS, USA), Fengfeng Ke (Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA)
Issue 2
Welcome to the International Journal of Game-Based Learning (IJGBL)
Editorial Preface
Patrick Felicia (Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland)
Article 1
Logs Analysis of Adapted Pedagogical Scenarios Generated by a Simulation Serious Game Architecture (pages 1-19)
Sophie Callies (University of Québec à Montréal, Department of Computer Science, Montréal, Canada), Mathieu Gravel (University of Québec à Montréal, Department of Computer Science, Montréal, Canada), Eric Beaudry (University of Québec à Montréal, Department of Computer Science, Montréal, Canada), Josianne Basque (TELUQ University, Department of Education, Québec, Canada)
Article 2
Serious Game Leverages Productive Negativity to Facilitate Conceptual Change in Undergraduate Molecular Biology: A Mixed-Methods Randomized Controlled Trial (pages 20-34)
Andrea Gauthier (University of Toronto, Institute of Medical Sciences, Toronto, Canada), Jodie Jenkinson (University of Toronto Mississauga, Biomedical Communications, Mississauga, Canada)
Article 3
Some Video Games Can Increase the Player's Creativity (pages 35-46)
David C. Moffat (Glasgow Caledonian University, Digital Design Technologies, Glasgow, United Kingdom), William Crombie (Glasgow Caledonian University, Digital Design Technologies, Glasgow, United Kingdom), Olga Shabalina (Volgograd State Technical University, CAD Department, Volgograd, Russia)
Article 4
Meaningful Gamification for Journalism Students to Enhance Their Critical Thinking Skills (pages 47-62)
Ling-Yi Huang (Nanfang College of Sun Yet-sen University, Department of Literature and Media Studies, Guangzhou, China), Yu-Chu Yeh (National Chengchi University, Institute of Teacher Education, Research Center for Mind, Brain & Learning, Taipei, Taiwan)
Issue 3
Playful Learning
Editorial Preface
Alex Moseley (University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom)
Article 2
Playing Digital Security: Youth Voices on their Digital Rights (pages 11-25)
Conceição Costa (Lusófona University, CIC.Digital (CICANT Pole), Lisbon, Portugal), Carla Sousa (Lusófona University, CIC.Digital (CICANT Pole), Lisbon, Portugal), José Rogado (Lusófona University, COPELABS - ECATI, Lisbon, Portugal), Sara Henriques (Lusófona University, CIC.Digital (CICANT Pole), Lisbon, Portugal)
Article 3
Perceptions of Play: Using Play-Doh to Enhance the Student Experience in Bioscience Higher Education (pages 26-37)
Gemma Lace-Costigan (CIC.Digital (CICANT Pole), University of Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom)
Article 4
Can Games Help Creative Writing Students to Collaborate on Story-Writing Tasks? (pages 38-50)
David Jackson (Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester School of Art, Manchester, England)
Article 5
We are the Game Changers: An Open Gaming Literacy Programme (pages 51-62)
Sylvester Arnab (Coventry University, Disruptive Media Learning Lab, Coventry, United Kingdom), Luca Morini (Coventry University, Disruptive Media Learning Lab, Coventry, United Kingdom), Kate Green (Coventry University, Disruptive Media Learning Lab, Coventry, United Kingdom), Alex Masters (Coventry University, Disruptive Media Learning Lab, Coventry, United Kingdom), Tyrone Bellamy-Woods (Coventry University, Disruptive Media Learning Lab, Coventry, United Kingdom)
Article 6
Using Formal Game Design Methods to Embed Learning Outcomes into Game Mechanics and Avoid Emergent Behaviour (pages 63-73)
Simon Grey (University of Hull, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Hull, United Kingdom), David Grey (York St. John University, York, United Kingdom), Neil Gordon (University of Hull, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Hull, United Kingdom), Jon Purdy (University of Hull, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Hull, United Kingdom)
Article 7
Playing Against the Game (pages 74-82)
Bernd Remmele (University of Education Freiburg, Institute for Vocational and Business Education, Freiburg, Germany)
Article 8
Case Study 1: Playful Team Reflection Using LEGO® Serious Play® (pages 83-86)
Tobias Seidl (Stuttgart Media University, Faculty Information and Communication, Stuttgart, Germany)
Article 9
Article 10
Case Study 3: Students' Experiences of Interdisciplinary Learning while Building Scientific Video Games (pages 93-97)
Charlene Jennett (University College London, UCLIC, London, United Kingdom), Sofia Papadopoulou (University College London, Extreme Citizen Science, London, United Kingdom), Jesse Himmelstein (Centre for Research and Interdisciplinary, Game Lab, Paris, France), Alexandre Vaugoux (Centre for Research and Interdisciplinary, Game Lab, Paris, France), Vincent Roger (Centre for Research and Interdisciplinary, Game Lab, Paris, France), Anna L. Cox (University College London, UCLIC, London, United Kingdom)
Article 11
Case Study 4: Using Game-Based Learning for Induction (pages 98-100)
Osman Javaid (Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom)
Issue 4
Article 1
Game-Based Learning and Information Literacy: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Two Information Literacy Learning Experiences (pages 1-21)
Scott Neal Wilson (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Caroline E. Engler (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Jessica E. Black (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Derik K. Yager-Elorriaga (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), William Michael Thompson (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Andrae McConnell (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Javier Elizondo Cecena (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Ryan Ralston (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma), Robert A. Terry (The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma)
Article 2
Gamifying the Media Classroom: Instructor Perspectives and the Multidimensional Impact of Gamification on Student Engagement (pages 22-49)
Katie Seaborn (University College London, London, United Kingdom), Deborah I. Fels (Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada), Rob Bajko (Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Canada), Jaigris Hodson (Royal Roads University, Victoria., Canada)
Article 3
Wise Humanising Creativity: Changing How We Create in a Virtual Learning Environment (pages 50-72)
Kerry Chappell (University of Exeter, Graduate School of Education, Exeter, United Kingdom), Chris Walsh (James Cook University, Townsville, Australia), Heather Wren (University of Exeter, Graduate School of Education, Exeter, United Kingdom), Karen Kenny (University of Exeter, Graduate School of Education, Exeter, United Kingdom), Alexander Schmoelz (University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria), Elias Stouraitis (Ellinogermaniki Agogi, R&D Department, Greece)
Article 4
Examining the Characteristics of Digital Learning Games Designed by In-service Teachers (pages 73-85)
Yun-Jo An (University of West Georgia, Carrollton, Georgia), Li Cao (University of West Georgia, Carrollton, Georgia)
Article 5
Mitigation of Cognitive Bias with a Serious Game: Two Experiments Testing Feedback Timing and Source (pages 86-100)
Norah E. Dunbar (University of California Santa Barbara, Department of Communication, Santa Barbara, California), Matthew L. Jensen (University of Oklahoma, Price College of Business and Center for Applied Social Research, Norman, Oklahoma), Claude H. Miller (University of Oklahoma, Department of Communication, Norman, Oklahoma), Elena Bessarabova (University of Oklahoma, Department of Communication, Norman, Oklahoma), Yu-Hao Lee (University of Florida, Department of Telecommunication, Gainesville, Florida), Scott N. Wilson (University of Oklahoma, K20 Center, Norman, Oklahoma), Javier Elizondo (University of Oklahoma, K20 Center, Norman, Oklahoma), Bradley J. Adame (Arizona State University, Hugh Downs School of Communication, Tempe, Arizona), Joseph Valacich (University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona), Sara Straub (Independent Researcher, Norman, Oklahoma), Judee K. Burgoon (University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona), Brianna Lane (Christopher Newport University, Department of Communication, Newport News, Virginia), Cameron W. Piercy (University of Central Missouri, Department of Management, Warrensburg, Missouri), David Wilson (University of Nebraska-Omaha, Department of Information Systems and Quantitative Analysis, Omaha, Nebraska), Shawn King (Independent Researcher, Norman, Oklahoma), Cindy Vincent (Salem State University, Department of Communications, Salem, Massachusetts), Ryan M. Schuetzler (University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Tucson, Arizona)
Volume 6 (2016)
Issue 1
Article 1
Computational Thinking in Constructionist Video Games (pages 1-17)
David Weintrop (Learning Sciences and Center for Connected Learning and Computer-Based Modeling, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA), Nathan Holbert (Mathematics, Science and Technology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA), Michael S. Horn (Learning Sciences, Computer Science, and Center for Connected Learning and Computer-Based Modeling, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA), Uri Wilensky (Learning Sciences, Computer Science, Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems, and Center for Connected Learning and Computer-Based Modeling, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA)
Article 2
An Overview and Study on the Use of Games, Simulations, and Gamification in Higher Education (pages 18-29)
Bradley E Wiggins (Webster University, Vienna, Austria)
Article 3
Mobile Learning: Technology as Mediator of Personal and School Experiences (pages 30-42)
Matthew Duvall (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Anthony Matranga (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Aroutis Foster (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Jason Silverman (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
Article 4
Designing and Deploying 3D Collaborative Games in Education (pages 43-57)
Apostolos Mavridis (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Theodouli Terzidou (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece)
Issue 2
Special Issue on the 9th European Conference on Games Based Learning
Editorial Preface
Patrick Felicia (Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland)
Article 1
Board Games and Board Game Design as Learning Tools for Complex Scientific Concepts: Some Experiences (pages 1-14)
Fabio Chiarello (IFN-CNR, Rome, Italy), Maria Gabriella Castellano (IFN-CNR, Rome, Italy)
Article 2
The Role of Awareness for Complex Planning Task Performance: A Microgaming Study (pages 15-28)
Heide Lukosch (Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands), Daan Groen (InThere, The Hague, Netherlands), Shalini Kurapati (Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands), Roland Klemke (Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, Netherlands), Alexander Verbraeck (Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands)
Article 3
What a Tangible Digital Installation for Museums Can Offer to Autistic Children and Their Teachers (pages 29-45)
Emanuela Marchetti (Department of Multimedia and IT, Lillebaelt Academy University of Applied Sciences, Odense, Denmark), Andrea Valente (Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark)
Article 4
VR-Based Gamification of Communication Training and Oral Examination in a Second Language (pages 46-61)
Liesa Reitz (University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany), Aline Sohny (University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany), Gerrit Lochmann (University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany)
Issue 3
Article 1
Learning in Discussion Forums: An Analysis of Knowledge Construction in a Gaming Affinity Space (pages 1-17)
Don Davis (University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA), Vittorio Marone (University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA)
Article 2
The Impact of a Racing Feature on Middle School Science Students' Performance in an Educational Game: The Effect of Content-Free Game-Actions (pages 18-33)
Marilyn Ault (University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA), Jana Craig-Hare (University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA), Bruce Frey (University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA)
Article 3
Exploring the Potential of a Location Based Augmented Reality Game for Language Learning (pages 34-49)
Donald Richardson (Language Centre, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany)
Article 4
Negative Experiences as Learning Trigger: A Play Experience Empirical Research on a Game for Social Change Case Study (pages 50-73)
Ilaria Mariani (Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy), Enrico Gandolfi (Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA)
Issue 4
Special Issue on the 5th Irish Conference on Game-Based Learning
Editorial Preface
Patrick Felicia (Department of Computing, Mathematics, and Physics, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland), Tim McNichols (Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dublin, Ireland)
Article 1
Unmasking the Mystique: Utilizing Narrative Character-Playing Games to Support English Language Fluency (pages 1-21)
Jennifer E. Killham (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA), Adam Saligman (Independent Researcher, Almaty, Kazakhstan), Kelli Jette (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA)
Article 2
Gaeilge Gaming: Assessing how games can help children to learn Irish (pages 22-38)
Gene Dalton (Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland), Ann Devitt (Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland)
Article 3
Even Buddhist Monks Use a Gong: A Mindfulness Skills Programme for Young People Delivered through the “Mindful Gnats” Computer Game and App. (pages 39-51)
Gary O' Reilly (School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland), David Coyle (School of Computer Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland), Conall Tunney (School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland)
Article 4
Digital Gesture-Based Games: An Evolving Classroom (pages 52-72)
Alison McNamara (Independent Researcher, Limerick, Ireland)
Article 5
Games for Social Change: Review of the Potential for Multi Player Online Gaming to Facilitate the Emergence and Growth of Progressive Movements for Social Change within Youth and Community Work (pages 73-86)
Paul Keating (Department of Applied Social Sciences, Limerick Institute of Technology (Tipperary), Thurles, Ireland)
Article 6
Towards a Conceptual Framework of GBL Design for Engagement and Learning of Curriculum-based Content (pages 87-108)
Azita Iliya Abdul Jabbar (Department of Computing, Mathematics, and Physics, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland), Patrick Felicia (Department of Computing, Mathematics, and Physics, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland)
Volume 5 (2015)
Issue 1
Article 1
Teachers' Experience and Reflections on Game-Based Learning in the Primary Classroom: Views from England and Italy (pages 1-17)
Yasemin Allsop (Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK), John Jessel (Goldsmiths, University of London, London, UK)
Article 2
Making Smart Choices: A Serious Game for Sex Education for Young Adolescents (pages 18-30)
Alvin C.M. Kwan (University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong), Samuel K.W. Chu (University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong), Athena W.L. Hong (School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong), Frankie Tam (FifthWisdom Technology Limited, Hong Kong), Grace M.Y. Lee (The Family Planning Association of Hong Kong, Wanchai, Hong Kong), Robin Mellecker (Institute of Human Performance, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Article 3
Mixed Reality Games (pages 31-45)
Jean-Charles Marty (LIRIS, UMR5205, F69621, Université de Lyon, France & Université de Savoie, France), Thibault Carron (LIP6, UMR7606, Sorbonne Universites, Paris 6, France & Université de Savoie, France), Philippe Pernelle (DISP Lab, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France), Stéphane Talbot (Université de Savoie, Chambéry, France), Gregory Houzet (Imep-Lahc Lab, Université de Savoie, Chambéry, France)
Article 4
Transforming Classrooms through Game-Based Learning: A Feasibility Study in a Developing Country (pages 46-57)
Poonsri Vate-U-Lan (Graduate School of eLearning, Assumption University, Bangkok, Thailand)
Issue 2
Article 1
Mobile Games Individualise and Motivate Rehabilitation in Different User Groups (pages 1-17)
Antti Koivisto (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Pori, Finland), Sari Merilampi (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Pori, Finland), Andrew Sirkka (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Pori, Finland)
Article 2
The Pedagogical Application of Alternate Reality Games: Using Game-Based Learning to Revisit History (pages 18-38)
Ronan Lynch (Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dundalk, Ireland), Bride Mallon (Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dundalk, Ireland), Cornelia Connolly (Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dundalk, Ireland)
Article 3
Gamified Assessment Supported by a Dynamic 3D Collaborative Game (pages 39-54)
Apostolos Mavridis (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Michalis Chatzakis (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Konstantinos Kitsikoudis (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece), Efthymios Lazarou (Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece)
Article 4
Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour (pages 55-69)
Tom van Dijk (University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands), Ton Spil (University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands), Sanne van der Burg (Accenture, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Ivo Wenzler (Accenture, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Simon Dalmolen (University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands)
Issue 3
Article 1
Exergaming as an Alternative for Students Unmotivated to Participate in Regular Physical Education Classes (pages 1-10)
Mateus David Finco (PPGIE/Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil), Eliseo Reategui (PPGIE/Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil), Milton Antonio Zaro (PPGIE/Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil), Dwayne D. Sheehan (Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada), Larry Katz (University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada)
Article 2
Students' Aesthetic Experiences of Playing Exergames: A Practical Epistemology Analysis of Learning (pages 11-24)
Ninitha Maivorsdotter (University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden), Mikael Quennerstedt (University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden), Marie Öhman (University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden)
Article 3
Learning Recycling from Playing a Kinect Game (pages 25-44)
José de Jesús Luis González Ibánez (Department of Computer Science and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway), Alf Inge Wang (Department of Computer Science and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)
Article 4
Multiplayer Kinect Serious Games: A Review (pages 45-61)
Ali Alshammari (Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA), David Whittinghill (Department of Computer Graphics Technology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA)
Article 5
Gaming the Classroom Viewing Learning Through the Lens Self Determination Theory (pages 62-78)
Antonia Szymanski (Indiana University Northwest, Valparaiso, IN, USA), Matthew Benus (Indiana University Northwest, Gary, IN, USA)
Issue 4
Article 1
Exergaming Theories: A Literature Review (pages 1-14)
Brian Kooiman (Lake Elsinore Unified School District, Lake Elsinore, CA, USA), Dwayne D. Sheehan (Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada)
Article 2
Mental Rotation Ability and Computer Game Experience (pages 15-26)
Zeynep Gecu (Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department, Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey), Kursat Cagiltay (Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey)
Article 3
Game Mastering in Collaborative Serious Games: A Novel Approach for Instructor Support in Multiplayer Serious Games (pages 27-49)
Viktor Wendel (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Stefan Krepp (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Michael Oliver Gutjahr (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Stefan Göbel (Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Ralf Steinmetz (Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany)
Article 4
Acceptance and Use of Game-Based Learning in Vocational Education and Training: An International Survey (pages 50-63)
Birgit Schmitz (Humance AG, Koln, Germany), Patrick Felicia (Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland), Filippo Bignami (ECAP, Lamone, Switzerland)
Volume 4 (2014)
Issue 1
Article 1
A Game-Based Approach to Support Social Presence and Awareness in Distributed Project-Based Learning (pages 1-20)
Björn Berg Marklund (University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden), Per Backlund (School of Humanities & Informatics, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden), Carl-Johan Dahlin (ius information AB, Skövde, Sweden), Henrik Engström (University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden), Ulf Wilhelmsson (University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden)
Article 2
Serious Gaming at School: Reflections on Students' Performance, Engagement and Motivation (pages 21-36)
Rosa Maria Bottino (Istituto Tecnologie Didattiche (ITD) - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Genova, Italy), Michela Ott (Istituto Tecnologie Didattiche (ITD) - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Genova, Italy), Mauro Tavella (Istituto Tecnologie Didattiche (ITD) - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Genova, Italy)
Article 3
A Framework for Structuring Learning Assessment in a Massively Multiplayer Online Educational Game: Experiment Centered Design (pages 37-59)
Shawn Conrad (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA), Jody Clarke-Midura (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA), Eric Klopfer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA)
Article 4
Studying the User Experience of a Tablet Based Math Game (pages 60-77)
Kristian Kiili (Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland), Harri Ketamo (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Pori, Finland), Antti Koivisto (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Pori, Finland), Enda Finn (Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dundalk, Ireland)
Article 5
The Importance of Future Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs about the Usefulness of Games Based Learning (pages 78-90)
Dionysios Manessis (Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Athens, Athens, Greece)
Issue 2
Article 1
Minecraft as a Creative Tool: A Case Study (pages 1-14)
Maria Cipollone (Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Catherine C. Schifter (Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA), Rick A. Moffat (Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
Article 2
Motivation Monitoring and Assessment Extension for Input-Process-Outcome Game Model (pages 15-35)
Ioana Ghergulescu (School of Computing, National College of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland), Cristina Hava Muntean (School of Computing, National College of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland)
Article 3
Modeling the Player: Predictability of the Models of Bartle and Kolb Based on NEO-FFI (Big5) and the Implications for Game Based Learning (pages 36-50)
Johannes Konert (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Multimedia Communication Lab (KOM), Darmstadt, Germany), Michael Gutjahr (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Multimedia Communication Lab (KOM), Darmstadt, Germany), Stefan Göbel (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Multimedia Communication Lab (KOM), Darmstadt, Germany), Ralf Steinmetz (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Multimedia Communication Lab (KOM), Darmstadt, Germany)
Article 4
Modeling Gameplay Enjoyment, Goal Orientations, and Individual Characteristics (pages 51-77)
John M. Quick (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA), Robert K. Atkinson (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA)
Article 5
Exploratory Play in Simulation Sandbox Games: A Review of What We Know About Why Players Act Crazy (pages 78-95)
Dominicus Tornqvist (Griffith University, South Bank, Queensland, Australia)
Issue 3
Article 1
Rewards and Penalties: A Gamification Approach for Increasing Attendance and Engagement in an Undergraduate Computing Module (pages 1-12)
Hope Caton (School of Computing and Information Systems, Kingston University, London, UK), Darrel Greenhill (School of Computing and Information Systems, Kingston University, London, UK)
Article 2
Using Game Mechanics to Measure What Students Learn from Programming Games (pages 13-22)
Jill Denner (ETR, Scotts Valley, CA, USA), Linda Werner (University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA), Shannon Campe (ETR, Scotts Valley, CA, USA), Eloy Ortiz (ETR, Scotts Valley, CA, USA)
Article 3
Adapting Cognitive Walkthrough to Support Game Based Learning Design (pages 23-34)
David Farrell (Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK), David C Moffat (Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK)
Article 4
Gamification and Smart Feedback: Experiences with a Primary School Level Math App (pages 35-46)
Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust (Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria), Eva-C. Hillemann (Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria), Dietrich Albert (Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria)
Article 5
The Play Theory and Computer Games Using in Early Childhood Education (pages 47-60)
Svetlana Gerkushenko (Early Childhood Education Department, Volgograd State Socio-Pedagogical University, Volgograd, Russian Federation), Georgy Gerkushenko (CAD Department, Volgograd State Technical University, Volgograd, Russian Federation)
Issue 4
Special Issue for the International Journal of Game Based Learning
Guest Editorial Preface
Christos Gatzidis (Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK), Eike Anderson (Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK)
Article 1
A Rating Tool for Sharing Experiences with Serious Games (pages 1-18)
Maurice Hendrix (The University of Northampton, Northampton, UK), Per Backlund (University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden), Boris Vampula (National Education and Teacher Training Agency, Zagreb, Croatia)
Article 2
Identifying Student Types in a Gamified Learning Experience (pages 19-36)
Gabriel Barata (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, INESC-ID / Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), Sandra Gama (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, INESC-ID / Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), Joaquim Jorge (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, INESC-ID / Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), Daniel Gonçalves (Department of Computer Science and Engineering, INESC-ID / Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal)
Article 3
Balancing Fun and Learning in a Serious Game Design (pages 37-57)
Christopher Franzwa (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, USA), Ying Tang (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, USA), Aaron Johnson (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, USA), Talbot Bielefeldt (Clearwater Program Evaluation, Eugene, OR, USA)
Article 4
Providing Career Guidance to Adolescents through Digital Games: A Case Study (pages 58-70)
Ian Dunwell (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Petros Lameras (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Sara de Freitas (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Panos Petridis (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Maurice Hendrix (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Sylvester Arnab (Serious Games Institute (SGI), Coventry University Coventry, Coventry, UK), Kam Star (PlayGen, London, UK)
Article 5
Critical Transport: A Serious Game to Teach the Recommendations for the Transport of Critically Ill Patients (pages 71-93)
Claudia Ribeiro (INESC-ID, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Universidade Te´cnica de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), Tiago Antunes (INESC-ID, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Universidade Te´cnica de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), João Pereira (INESC-ID, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Universidade Te´cnica de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal), Micaela Monteiro (Serviço de Urgeˆncia Geral Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Ocidental, Lisbon, Portugal)
Volume 3 (2013)
Issue 1
Article 1
An Evaluation of the Added Value of Co-Design in the Development of an Educational Game for Road Safety (pages 1-17)
Anissa All (Department of Communication Sciences, iMinds-MICT-Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Jan Van Looy (Department of Communication Sciences, iMinds-MICT-Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Elena Patricia Nuñez Castellar (Department of Communication Sciences, iMinds-MICT-Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium)
Article 2
The Value of Team-Based Mixed-Reality (TBMR) Games in Higher Education (pages 18-33)
John A. Denholm (Serious Games Institute, Coventry, West Midlands, UK), Aristidis Protopsaltis (Serious Games Institute, Coventry, West Midlands, UK), Sara de Freitas (Serious Games Institute, Coventry, West Midlands, UK)
Article 3
Perceived Sociability and Social Presence in a Collaborative Serious Game (pages 34-50)
Kimmo Oksanen (Finnish Institute for Educational Research, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland), Raija Hämäläinen (Finnish Institute for Educational Research, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland)
Article 4
Behavioral Evaluation of Preference for Game-Based Teaching Procedures (pages 51-62)
Leonardo Brandão Marques (Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia sobre Comportamento, Cognição e Ensino (ECCE), Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil), Deisy das Graças de Souza (Departmento de Psicologia, Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia sobre Comportamento, Cognição e Ensino (ECCE), Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil)
Article 5
An Authoring Tool for Educational Adventure Games: Concept, Game Models and Authoring Processes (pages 63-79)
Florian Mehm (Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Stefan Göbel (Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Ralf Steinmetz (Multimedia Communications Lab (KOM), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany)
Article 6
The Impact of Students’ Temporal Perspectives on Time-On-Task and Learning Performance in Game Based Learning (pages 80-92)
Margarida Romero (Escuela Superior de Administración y Dirección de Empresas, Business and Law School, Universitat Ramon, Barcelona, Spain), Mireia Usart (Escuela Superior de Administración y Dirección de Empresas, Business and Law School, Universitat Ramon, Barcelona, Spain)
Article 7
Using Scratch with Primary School Children: An Evaluation of Games Constructed to Gauge Understanding of Programming Concepts (pages 93-109)
Amanda Wilson (School of Computing, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK), Thomas Hainey (School of Computing, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK), Thomas M. Connolly (School of Computing, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK)
Issue 2
Article 1
Factors at Play in Tertiary Curriculum Gamification (pages 1-21)
Penny de Byl (Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Australia)
Article 2
Learning to Play, Playing to Learn: Comparing the Experiences of Adult Foreign Language Learners with Off-the-Shelf and Specialized Games for Learning German (pages 22-35)
Frederik De Grove (Department of Communication Sciences (iMinds-MICT), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Jan Van Looy (Department of Communication Sciences (iMinds-MICT), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium), Peter Mechant (Department of Communication Sciences (iMinds-MICT), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium)
Article 3
Strategy Instruction and Maintenance of Basic Multiplication Facts through Digital Game Play (pages 36-54)
André R. Denham (Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA)
Article 4
Evaluating the Relationship between Cognitive Style and Pre-Service Teachers’ Preconceived Notions about Adopting Console Video Games for Use in Future Classrooms (pages 55-76)
Rudy McDaniel (Department of Digital Media, School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA), Robert Kenny (Department of Leadership, Counseling, and Educational Technology, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL, USA)
Article 5
Game Coaching System Design and Development: A Retrospective Case Study of FPS Trainer (pages 77-90)
Wee Hoe Tan (Department of Art, Computing and Creative Industry, Sultan Idris Education University, Tanjung Malim, Perak, Malaysia)
Article 6
The Opinions and Attitudes of the Foreign Language Learners and Teachers Related to the Traditional and Digital Games: Age and Gender Differences (pages 91-111)
Levent Uzun (Department of English Language Teaching, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey), M. Tugba Yildiz Ekin (Department of English Language Teaching, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey), Erdogan Kartal (Department of French Language Teaching, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey)
Article 7
Juvenile Offenders: Developing Motivation, Engagement, and Meaning-Making through Video Game Creation (pages 112-129)
Dana Ruggiero (School of Education, Bath Spa University, Bath, UK), Belen Garcia de Hurtado (Department of Learning, Design and Technology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA), William R. Watson (Department of Learning, Design and Technology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA)
Issue 3
Special Issue on the Fifth Annual Interactive Technology and Games: Education, Health and Disability International Conference
Guest Editorial Preface
Lindsay Evett (Interactive Systems Research Group (ISRG), Computing and Technology Team, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK), David Brown (Interactive Systems Research Group (ISRG), Computing and Technology Team, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Article 1
Overcoming the Barriers to Uptake: A Study of 6 Danish Health-Based Serious Games Projects (pages 1-9)
Damian Brown (Serious Games Interactive, Copenhagen, Denmark)
Article 2
Integrating Serious Games in the Educational Experience of Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Towards a Playful and Integrative Model (pages 10-20)
Maria Saridaki (Faculty of Communication and Mass Media Studies, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece), Constantinos Mourlas (Faculty of Communication and Mass Media Studies, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece)
Article 3
Using Biometric Measurement in Real-Time as a Sympathetic System in Computer Games (pages 21-42)
Stephanie Charij (School of Computing & Mathematics, University of Derby, Derby, UK), Andreas Oikonomou (School of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Article 4
Second-Hand Masculinity: Do Boys with Intellectual Disabilities Use Computer Games as Part of Gender Practice? (pages 43-53)
D. Charnock (School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK), P. J. Standen (School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)
Article 5
Female Gamers: A Thematic Analysis of Their Gaming Experience (pages 54-71)
Lavinia McLean (International Gaming Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK), Mark D. Griffiths (International Gaming Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Issue 4
Article 1
Towards a New Learning: Play and Game-Based Approaches to Education (pages 1-6)
Sara de Freitas (Serious Games Institute, Coventry University, Coventry, UK)
Article 2
MACBETH: Development of a Training Game for the Mitigation of Cognitive Bias (pages 7-26)
Norah E. Dunbar (Department of Communication, Center for Applied Social Research, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Scott N. Wilson (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Bradley J. Adame (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Javier Elizondo (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Matthew L. Jensen (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Claude H. Miller (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Abigail Allums Kauffman (University of Texas Permian Basin, Odessa, TX, USA), Toby Seltsam (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Elena Bessarabova (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Cindy Vincent (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Sara K. Straub (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Ryan Ralston (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA), Christopher L. Dulawan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA), Dennis Ramirez (University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA), Kurt Squire (University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI, USA), Joseph S. Valacich (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA), Judee K. Burgoon (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA)
Article 3
An International Study on Learning and Process Choices in the Global Game Jam (pages 27-46)
Ali Arya (School of Information Technology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada), Jeff Chastine (Southern Polytechnic State University, Marietta, GA, USA), Jon Preston (School of Computing and Software Engineering, Southern Polytechnic State University, Marietta, GA, USA), Allan Fowler (Waiariki Institute of Technology, Rotorua, New Zealand)
Article 4
Are Good Games Also Good Problems?: Content Analysis of Problem Types and Learning Principles in Environmental Education Games (pages 47-61)
Yu-Hao Lee (Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies & Media, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA)
The Guide to Computer Simulations and Games: A Review
Book Review
Christos Gatzidis (School of Design, Engineering, and Computing, University of Bournemouth, Poole, UK)
Leading Issues in Game-Based Learning Research
Book Review
Richard Sandford (Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)
Volume 2 (2012)
Issue 1
Article 1
How do Professionals’ Attitudes Differ between what Game-Based Learning could Ideally Achieve and what is Usually Achieved (pages 1-15)
Wee Hoe Tan (Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia), Sean Neill (University of Warwick, UK), Sue Johnston-Wilder (University of Warwick, UK)
Article 2
Is there a Place for Casual Games in Teaching and Learning?: The Snakes and Ladders Case (pages 16-32)
Vasilis Daloukas (Secondary School Teacher of Informatics, Greece), Maria Rigou (University of Patras, Greece), Spiros Sirmakessis (Technological Institution of Mesolonghi, Greece)
Article 3
Teachers’ Views on the Approach of Digital Games-Based Learning within the Curriculum for Excellence (pages 33-51)
Aishah Abdul Razak (University of the West of Scotland, UK), Thomas Connolly (University of the West of Scotland, UK), Thomas Hainey (University of the West of Scotland, UK)
Article 4
Martian Boneyards: Scientific Inquiry in an MMO Game (pages 52-76)
Jodi Asbell-Clarke (TERC, USA), Teon Edwards (TERC, USA), Elizabeth Rowe (TERC, USA), Jamie Larsen (TERC, USA), Elisabeth Sylvan (TERC, USA), Jim Hewitt (University of Toronto, Canada)
Article 5
PBL as a Framework for Implementing Video Games in the Classroom (pages 77-89)
William R. Watson (Purdue University, USA), Jun Fang (Purdue University, USA)
Article 6
Learning with Digital Games: A Practical Guide to Engaging Students in Higher Education (pages 90-91)
Christos Gatzidis (Bournemouth University, UK)
Issue 2
Article 1
Game-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Strategy to Integrate Digital Games into Secondary Schools (pages 1-12)
Nathalie Charlier (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium), Bieke De Fraine (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium)
Article 2
Designing Tutorial Modalities and Strategies for Digital Games: Lessons from Education (pages 13-34)
Matthew M. White (Penn State University, Erie, USA)
Article 3
Console Game-Based Pedagogy: A Study of Primary and Secondary Classroom Learning through Console Video Games (pages 35-54)
Jennifer Groff (Learning Games Network, USA), Cathrin Howells (Education Consultant, UK), Sue Cranmer (Futurelab, UK)
Article 4
Detecting Learning Style through Biometric Technology for Mobile GBL (pages 55-74)
Tracey J. Mehigan (University College Cork, Ireland), Ian Pitt (University College Cork, Ireland)
Article 5
Player Types, Play Styles, and Play Complexity: Updating the Entertainment Grid (pages 75-89)
Ricardo Javier Rademacher Mena (Futur-E-Scape, USA)
Article 6
Math Learning Environment with Game-Like Elements: An Experimental Framework (pages 90-110)
Dovan Rai (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA), Joseph E. Beck (Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA)
Issue 3
Article 1
Concept Learning and the Limitations of Arcade-Style Games (pages 1-10)
David Richard Moore (Ohio University, USA), E-ling Hsiao (Valdosta State University, USA)
Article 2
Empirical Taxonomies of Gameplay Enjoyment: Personality and Video Game Preference (pages 11-31)
John M. Quick (Arizona State University, USA), Robert K. Atkinson (Arizona State University, USA), Lijia Lin (East China Normal University, China)
Article 3
An Alternate Reality for Education?: Lessons to be Learned from Online Immersive Games (pages 32-50)
Alex Moseley (University of Leicester, UK)
Article 4
Game Jams: Community, Motivations, and Learning among Jammers (pages 51-70)
Jon A Preston (Southern Polytechnic State University, USA), Jeff Chastine (Southern Polytechnic State University, USA), Casey O’Donnell (University of Georgia, USA), Tony Tseng (Savannah College of Art and Design, USA), Blair MacIntyre (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)
Article 5
ALFIL: A Crowd Simulation Serious Game for Massive Evacuation Training and Awareness (pages 71-86)
César García-García (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico), José Luis Fernández-Robles (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico), Victor Larios-Rosillo (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico), Hervé Luga (Institut de Recherche en Informatique de Toulouse, France)
Article 6
The Learning Games Design Model: Immersion, Collaboration, and Outcomes-Driven Development (pages 87-110)
Barbara Chamberlin (New Mexico State University, USA), Jesús Trespalacios (New Mexico State University, USA), Rachel Gallagher (New Mexico State University, USA)
Issue 4
Article 1
Arm Chair Activism: Serious Games usage by INGOs for Educational Change (pages 1-17)
Payal Arora (Department of Media and Communication, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands), Sorina Itu (Department of Media and Communication, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
Article 2
Playability Guidelines for Educational Video Games: A Comprehensive and Integrated Literature Review (pages 18-40)
Amer Ibrahim (Video Games and E-learning Research Lab (LIVE), GEDES Research Group, Department of Software Engineering, University of Granada, Granada, Spain), Francisco Luis Gutiérrez Vela (Video Games and E-learning Research Lab (LIVE), GEDES Research Group, Department of Languages and Computer Systems, University of Granada, Granada, Spain), Patricia Paderewski Rodríguez (Video Games and E-learning Research Lab (LIVE), GEDES Research Group, University of Granada, Granada, Spain), José Luís González Sánchez (Video Games and E-learning Research Lab (LIVE), GEDES Research Group, University of Granada, Granada, Spain), Natalia Padilla Zea (Video Games and E-learning Research Lab (LIVE), GEDES Research Group, University of Granada, Granada, Spain)
Article 3
Article 4
Applying Serious Games to Motor Learning in Sport (pages 61-73)
Josef Wiemeyer (Institute of Sport Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany), Philipp Schneider (Institute of Sport Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt, Germany)
Article 5
Introducing Cool School: Where Peace Rules and Conflict Resolution can be Fun (pages 74-83)
Mark Young (President, Rational Games, Inc., Berlin, Germany), Melanie Killen (Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA), Jennie Lee-Kim (Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA), Yoonjung Park (Children’s Defense Fund, Washington, D.C., USA)
Volume 1 (2011)
Issue 1
Article 1
Digital Games: Changing Education, One Raid at a Time. (pages 1-18)
Paul Pivec (CranberryBlue R & D, New Zealand), Maja Pivec (FH JOANNEUM University of Applied Sciences, Austria)
Article 2
The Magic Bullet: A Tool for Assessing and Evaluating Learning Potential in Games (pages 19-31)
Katrin Becker (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Article 3
Honing Emotional Intelligence with Game-Based Crucible Experiences (pages 32-44)
Elaine M. Raybourn (Sandia National Laboratories, USA)
Article 4
A Psycho-Pedagogical Framework for Multi-Adaptive Educational Games (pages 45-58)
Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust (University of Graz, Austria), Elke Mattheiss (University of Graz, Austria), Christina Steiner (University of Graz, Austria), Dietrich Albert (University of Graz, Austria)
Article 5
Video Game Genre Affordances for Physics Education (pages 59-74)
Kostas Anagnostou (Ionian University, Greece), Anastasia Pappa (Alibreto Science Communication and Education, Greece)
Article 6
Encouraging Engagement in Game-Based Learning (pages 75-84)
Nicola Whitton (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)
Issue 2
Article 1
Leveraging Mobile Games for Place-Based Language Learning (pages 1-18)
Christopher L. Holden (University of New Mexico, USA), Julie M. Sykes (University of New Mexico, USA)
Article 2
DataPlay: Experiments in the Ludic Age (pages 19-33)
Colleen Macklin (Parsons The New School for Design, USA)
Article 3
Possibility Spaces: Using The Sims 2 as a Sandbox to Explore Possible Selves with At-Risk Teenage Males (pages 34-51)
Elizabeth King (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
Article 4
Affordances and Constraints of Scaffolded Learning in a Virtual World for Young Children (pages 52-64)
Rebecca W. Black (University of California, Irvine, USA), Stephanie M. Reich (University of California, Irvine, USA)
Article 5
Collaborative Strategic Board Games as a Site for Distributed Computational Thinking (pages 65-81)
Matthew Berland (University of Texas at San Antonio, USA), Victor R. Lee (Utah State University, USA)
Article 6
Forming The Guild: Star Power and Rethinking Projective Identity In Affinity Spaces (pages 82-95)
Elizabeth Ellcessor (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA), Sean C. Duncan (Miami University, USA)
Issue 3
Article 1
Fear of (Serious) Digital Games and Game-Based Learning?: Causes, Consequences and a Possible Countermeasure (pages 1-15)
Wolfgang Bösche (University of Education Karlsruhe, Germany), Florian Kattner (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
Article 2
Assessment through Achievement Systems: A Framework for Educational Game Design (pages 16-29)
Monica Evans (The University of Texas at Dallas, USA), Erin Jennings (The University of Texas at Dallas, USA), Michael Andreen (The University of Texas at Dallas, USA)
Article 3
Understanding Computational Thinking before Programming: Developing Guidelines for the Design of Games to Learn Introductory Programming through Game-Play (pages 30-52)
Cagin Kazimoglu (University of Greenwich, UK), Mary Kiernan (University of Greenwich, UK), Liz Bacon (University of Greenwich, UK), Lachlan MacKinnon (University of Greenwich, UK)
Article 4
Background Music in Educational Games: Motivational Appeal and Cognitive Impact (pages 53-64)
Stephanie B. Linek (University of Graz, Austria), Birgit Marte (University of Graz, Austria), Dietrich Albert (University of Graz, Austria)
Article 5
Content Design Patterns for Game-Based Learning (pages 65-82)
Dennis Maciuszek (University of Rostock, Germany), Sebastian Ladhoff (University of Rostock, Germany), Alke Martens (University of Rostock, Germany)
Article 6
Historical Perspectives on Games and Education from the Learning Sciences (pages 83-106)
Brett E. Shelton (Utah State University, USA), Tom Satwicz (Blink Interactive, USA), Tom Caswell (Utah State University, USA)
Issue 4
Article 1
Formulating a Serious-Games Design Project for Adult Offenders with the Probation Service (pages 1-10)
Matthew Ian Bates (Nottingham Trent University, UK), David Brown (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Wayne Cranton (Nottingham Trent University, UK), James Lewis (Nottingham Trent University, UK)
Article 2
Designing Serious Games for People with Disabilities: Game, Set and Match to the Wii™ (pages 11-19)
Lindsay Evett (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Allan Ridley (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Liz Keating (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Patrick Merritt (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Nick Shopland (Nottingham Trent University, UK), David Brown (Nottingham Trent University, UK)
Article 3
Social Interactions in Online Gaming (pages 20-36)
Mark Griffiths (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Zaheer Hussain (University of Derby, UK), Sabine M. Grüsser (Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Germany), Ralf Thalemann (Charité–University Medicine Berlin, Germany), Helena Cole (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Mark N.O. Davies (University of East London, UK), Darren Chappell (Nottingham Trent University, UK)
Article 4
The Mobile Learning Network: Getting Serious about Games Technologies for Learning (pages 37-48)
Rebecca Petley (LSN, UK), Guy Parker (LSN, UK), Jill Attewell (LSN, UK)
Article 5
Motivational Aspects of Gaming for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (pages 49-59)
Maria Saridaki (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece), Constantinos Mourlas (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
Article 6
The Use of Motion Tracking Technologies in Serious Games to Enhance Rehabilitation in Stroke Patients (pages 60-73)
Andrew M. Burton (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Hao Liu (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Steven Battersby (Nottingham Trent University, UK), David Brown (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Nasser Sherkat (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Penny Standen (University of Nottingham, UK), Marion Walker (University of Nottingham, UK)